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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

x      ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2015

 

OR

 

o         TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from              to             

 

Commission File Number: 001-34403

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc.

(Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Maryland

 

26-4674701

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

 

 

 

1132 Bishop Street, Suite 2200, Honolulu, Hawaii

 

96813

(Address of Principal Executive Office)

 

(Zip Code)

 

(808) 946-1400

(Registrant’s Telephone Number including area code)

 

Securities Registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

(Title of Class)

 

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

(Name of exchange on which registered)

 

Securities Registered Under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act:

None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  YES o NO x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 of 15(d) of the Act. YES o NO x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file reports), and (2) has been subject to such requirements for the past 90 days. YES x NO o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes x No o

 

Indicate by a check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendments to this Form 10-K. o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer o

 

Accelerated filer  x

Non-accelerated filer  o

 

Smaller reporting company  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) o YES x NO

 

The aggregate value of the voting common equity held by nonaffiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of the registrant’s shares of common stock as of June 30, 2015 ($24.26) was $211.5 million.

 

As of February 29, 2016, there were 9,659,685 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 



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TERRITORIAL BANCORP INC.

FORM 10-K

INDEX

 

PART I

 

2

ITEM 1.

Business

2

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

19

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

30

ITEM 2.

Properties

31

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

31

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

32

 

 

 

PART II

 

32

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

32

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

35

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

36

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

65

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

65

ITEM 9.

Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

121

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

121

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

121

 

 

 

PART III

 

122

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

122

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

122

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

123

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

123

ITEM 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

123

 

 

 

PART IV

 

124

ITEM 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

124

 



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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report contains forward-looking statements, which can be identified by the use of words such as “estimate,” “project,” “believe,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “seek,” “expect,” “will,” “may” and words of similar meaning.  These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

 

·                                          statements of our goals, intentions and expectations;

 

·                                          statements regarding our business plans, prospects, growth and operating strategies;

 

·                                          statements regarding the asset quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and

 

·                                          estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.

 

These forward-looking statements are based on our current beliefs and expectations and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control.  In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change.  Except as may be required by law, we disclaim any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:

 

·                                          general economic conditions, internationally, nationally or in our market areas, that are worse than expected;

 

·                                          competition among depository and other financial institutions;

 

·                                          inflation and changes in the interest rate environment that reduce our margins or reduce the fair value of financial instruments;

 

·                                          adverse changes in the securities or credit markets;

 

·                                          changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees and capital requirements;

 

·                                          our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;

 

·                                          our ability to successfully integrate acquired entities, if any;

 

·                                          changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;

 

·                                          changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board;

 

·                                          changes in our organization, compensation and benefit plans;

 

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·                                          the timing and amount of revenues that we may recognize;

 

·                                          the value and marketability of collateral underlying our loan portfolios;

 

·                                          the impact of recent legislation to restructure the U.S. financial and regulatory system;

 

·                                          the quality and composition of our investment portfolio;

 

·                                          changes in our financial condition or results of operations that reduce capital available to pay dividends; and

 

·                                          changes in the financial condition or future prospects of issuers of securities that we own.

 

Because of these and a wide variety of other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements.  Please also see “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.                          Business

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc.

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc. is a Maryland corporation and owns 100% of the outstanding common stock of Territorial Savings Bank.  On July 10, 2009, we completed our initial public offering of common stock in connection with the mutual-to-stock conversion of Territorial Mutual Holding Company, selling 12,233,125 shares of common stock at $10.00 per share. Since the completion of our initial public offering, we have not engaged in any significant business activity other than owning the common stock of and having savings deposits in Territorial Savings Bank, paying dividends and repurchasing shares of common stock.  At December 31, 2015, we had consolidated assets of $1.821 billion, consolidated deposits of $1.445 billion and consolidated stockholders’ equity of $219.6 million.

 

Our executive offices are located at 1132 Bishop Street, Suite 2200, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813.  Our telephone number at this address is (808) 946-1400.

 

Territorial Savings Bank

 

Territorial Savings Bank is a Hawaii state-chartered savings bank headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii.  Territorial Savings Bank was organized in 1921, and reorganized into the mutual holding company structure in 2002.  Territorial Savings Bank is currently the wholly-owned subsidiary of Territorial Bancorp Inc.  We provide financial services to individuals, families and businesses through our 28 banking offices located throughout the State of Hawaii.

 

On June 25, 2014, Territorial Savings Bank converted from a federal savings bank to a Hawaii state-chartered savings bank.  On July 10, 2014, Territorial Savings Bank became a member of the Federal Reserve System.

 

Territorial Savings Bank’s executive offices are located at 1132 Bishop Street, Suite 2200, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813.  Our telephone number at this address is (808) 946-1400.

 

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Available Information

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc. is a public company, and files interim, quarterly and annual reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  These reports are on file and a matter of public record with the Securities and Exchange Commission and may be read and copied at the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Public Reference Room at 450 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20549.  The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the Securities and Exchange Commission at 1-800-SEC-0330.  The Securities and Exchange Commission maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC (http://www.sec.gov).

 

Our website address is www.territorialsavings.net.  Information on our website should not be considered a part of this annual report.

 

General

 

Territorial Savings Bank’s business consists primarily of accepting deposits from the general public and investing those deposits, together with funds generated from operations and borrowings, in one- to four-family residential mortgage loans and investment securities.  To a much lesser extent, we also originate home equity loans and lines of credit, construction, commercial and other nonresidential real estate loans, consumer loans, multi-family mortgage loans and other loans.  Territorial Savings Bank offers a variety of deposit accounts, including passbook and statement savings accounts, certificates of deposit, money market accounts, commercial and regular checking accounts and Super NOW accounts.  Through our subsidiary, Territorial Financial Services, Inc., we engage in insurance agency activities.  We also offer various non-deposit investments to our customers, including annuities and mutual funds, through a third-party broker-dealer.

 

Market Area

 

We conduct business from our corporate offices and from our 28 full-service branch offices located throughout the State of Hawaii.

 

The largest sector of Hawaii’s economy is the visitor industry.  The Hawaii Tourism Authority reported that 8.6 million visitors came to the state in 2015, a 4.1% increase compared to 2014.  The increase in visitor arrivals is primarily due to growth in the number of visitors from the continental United States, Australia and China.  Total visitor expenditures in 2015 totaled $15.159 billion, a 2.3% increase compared to 2014.

 

The unemployment rate for the State of Hawaii was 3.2% in December 2015, representing a decrease from a 4.0% rate in December 2014.  Hawaii’s unemployment rate continued to be lower than the 5.0% rate for the entire United States for December 2015. The growth in the visitor and construction industries have supported the local economy and kept the state’s unemployment rate lower than the national rate.  The construction of several new condominium projects and work on the City and County of Honolulu’s mass transit project has increased employment in Hawaii’s construction industry.

 

The number of sales and the median sale prices of existing single-family homes and condominium units sold increased in 2015 compared to 2014.  On the island of Oahu, the primary real estate market in Hawaii, sales of existing single-family homes totaled 3,455 units for the year ended December 31, 2015, an increase of 5.2% compared to sales in 2014.  The number of condominium sales, a notable portion of the overall housing market, grew by 4.5% in 2015 compared to 2014.  The median price paid on Oahu for a single-family home in December 2015 was $700,000, an increase of 1.4% compared to the median price in December 2014.  The median price paid on Oahu for condominiums in December 2015 was $386,250, an increase of 6.9% compared to the median price in December 2014.

 

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On the island of Maui, the second largest real estate market in Hawaii, sales of existing single-family homes totaled 1,090 units in 2015, an increase of 15.7% compared to similar sales during 2014.  The number of condominium sales decreased by two units in 2015 compared to 2014.  The median price paid for a single-family home on Maui in December 2015 was $580,000, an increase of 1.8% compared to the median price in December 2014.  The median price paid on Maui for condominiums in December 2015 was $410,000, a 7.9% increase compared to the median price in December 2014.

 

Foreclosure and bankruptcy filings fell in 2015 compared to 2014.  In 2015, there were 1,826 mortgage foreclosure cases in Hawaii, a 12.4% decrease from 2014.  In 2015, there were 1,569 bankruptcy filings, a decrease of 7.8% compared to the number of filings in 2014.  The decrease in foreclosure and bankruptcy filings is primarily due to growth in Hawaii’s economy.

 

Competition

 

We face intense competition in our market area both in making loans and attracting deposits.  We compete with commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies and investment banking firms.  Some of our competitors have greater name recognition and market presence that benefit them in attracting business, and offer certain services that we do not or cannot provide.

 

Our deposit sources are primarily concentrated in the communities surrounding our banking offices, located in all four counties in the State of Hawaii.  As of June 30, 2015 (the latest date for which information is publicly available), we ranked fifth in FDIC-insured deposit market share in the State of Hawaii (out of 13 banks and thrift institutions with offices in Hawaii), with a 3.7% market share.  As of that date, our largest market share was in the City and County of Honolulu, where we ranked fifth in deposit market share (out of 13 banks and thrift institutions with offices in the City and County) with a 3.9% market share.

 

Lending Activities

 

Our primary lending activity is the origination of one- to four-family residential mortgage loans.  To a much lesser extent, we also originate home equity loans and lines of credit, construction, commercial and other nonresidential real estate loans, consumer loans, multi-family mortgage loans and commercial business loans.

 

One- to Four-Family Residential Mortgage Loans.  At December 31, 2015, $1.146 billion, or 95.9% of our total loan portfolio, consisted of one- to four-family residential mortgage loans.  We offer conforming, fixed-rate and adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans with maturities generally up to 30 years.  There has been little demand for adjustable-rate mortgage loans in our market area.

 

One- to four-family residential mortgage loans are generally underwritten according to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guidelines, and we refer to loans that conform to such guidelines as “conforming loans.”  We generally originate both fixed- and adjustable-rate mortgage loans in amounts up to the maximum conforming loan limits as established by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which is currently $625,500 for single-family homes located in the State of Hawaii.  We also originate loans above this amount, which are referred to as “jumbo loans.”  These jumbo loan amounts are generally up to $1.0 million, although we do originate loans above this amount.  We generally originate fixed-rate jumbo loans with terms of up to 30 years.  We have not originated significant amounts of adjustable-rate jumbo loans in recent years due to customer preference for fixed-rate loans in our market area.  We generally underwrite jumbo loans in a manner similar to conforming loans.  Jumbo loans are not uncommon in our market area.

 

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We originate loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80%, up to and including a loan-to-value ratio of 100%.  We generally require private mortgage insurance for loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80%.  During the year ended December 31, 2015, we originated $9.8 million of one- to four-family residential mortgage loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80%. We offer a variety of credit programs for low- to moderate-income and first-time home purchasers.  These include our first time home purchaser program, where the borrower will receive up to a 50 basis point reduction in points charged in connection with the loan.  We also originate first mortgage loans to lower-income individuals who reside in rural census tracts where the U.S. Department of Agriculture will issue a second mortgage and complete the underwriting of the loan, subject to our review before origination.  We also offer both FHA and VA fixed-rate loans.

 

Other than our loans for the construction of one- to four-family residential mortgage loans (described under “—Nonresidential Real Estate Loans”), we currently do not originate new “interest only” mortgage loans on one- to four-family residential properties (where the borrower pays interest for an initial period, after which the loan converts to a fully amortizing loan).  We also do not offer loans that provide for negative amortization of principal, such as “Option ARM” loans, where the borrower can pay less than the interest owed on their loan, resulting in an increased principal balance during the life of the loan.  We do not offer “subprime loans” (loans that generally target borrowers with weakened credit histories typically characterized by payment delinquencies, previous charge-offs, judgments, bankruptcies, or borrowers with questionable repayment capacity as evidenced by low credit scores or high debt-burden ratios) or Alt-A loans (traditionally defined as nonconforming loans having less than full documentation).

 

Home Equity Loans and Lines of Credit.  In addition to traditional one- to four-family residential mortgage loans, we offer home equity loans and home equity lines of credit that are secured primarily by one- to four-family residential homes.  Home equity lines of credit have a maximum term of 10 years during which time the borrower is required to make payments to principal based on the amortization of 0.125% of principal outstanding per month.  The borrower is permitted to draw against the line during the entire term.  Our home equity lines of credit are originated with adjustable rates of interest or with fixed rates of interest that convert to adjustable rates of interest after an initial period of up to three years.  Our home equity loans are originated with fixed rates of interest and with terms of up to 30 years.  Home equity loans and lines of credit are generally underwritten with the same criteria that we use to underwrite one- to four-family residential mortgage loans.  Home equity loans may be underwritten with a loan-to-value ratio of 80% when combined with the principal balance of the existing mortgage loan, while lines of credit for owner-occupied properties and investment properties may be underwritten with loan-to-value ratios of 80% and 65%, respectively, when combined with the principal balance of the existing mortgage loan.  We require appraisals on home equity loans and lines of credit.  At the time we close a home equity loan or line of credit, we record a mortgage to perfect our security interest in the underlying collateral.  At December 31, 2015, the outstanding balance of home equity loans totaled $3.0 million, or 0.3% of our total loan portfolio, and the outstanding balance of home equity lines of credit totaled $12.3 million, or 1.0% of our total loan portfolio.

 

Nonresidential Real Estate Loans.  Our nonresidential real estate loans consist primarily of commercial real estate loans and construction loans for residential real estate projects.  These loans totaled $19.3 million, or 1.6% of our loan portfolio as of December 31, 2015.  The commercial real estate properties primarily include owner-occupied light industrial properties.  We generally seek to originate commercial real estate loans with initial principal balances of $1.0 million or less.  Loans secured by

 

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commercial real estate totaled $9.8 million, or 0.8%, of our total loan portfolio at December 31, 2015, and consisted of 12 loans outstanding with an average loan balance of approximately $815,000.  All of our nonresidential real estate loans are secured by properties located in our primary market area.  At December 31, 2015, our largest commercial real estate loan had a principal balance of $3.1 million and was secured by real property and improvements utilized as an office building.  This loan was performing in accordance with its original terms at December 31, 2015.

 

In the underwriting of commercial real estate loans, we generally lend up to the lesser of 75% of the property’s appraised value or purchase price.  We base our decision to lend primarily on the economic viability of the property and the creditworthiness of the borrower.  In evaluating a proposed commercial real estate loan, we emphasize the ratio of the property’s projected net cash flow to the loan’s debt service requirement (generally requiring a minimum ratio of 110%), computed after deduction for a vacancy factor and property expenses we deem appropriate.  Personal guarantees are usually obtained from commercial real estate borrowers.  We require title insurance, fire and extended coverage casualty insurance, and, if appropriate, flood insurance, in order to protect our security interest in the underlying property.  Almost all of our commercial real estate loans are generated internally by our loan officers.

 

Commercial real estate loans generally carry higher interest rates and have shorter terms than one- to four-family residential mortgage loans.  Commercial real estate loans, however, entail greater credit risks compared to one- to four-family residential mortgage loans, as they typically involve larger loan balances concentrated with single borrowers or groups of related borrowers.  In addition, the payment of loans secured by income-producing properties typically depends, in large part, on sufficient income from the property to cover operating expenses and debt service.  Changes in economic conditions that are not in the control of the borrower or lender could affect the value of the collateral for the loan or the future cash flow of the property.  Additionally, any decline in real estate values may be more pronounced for commercial real estate than for residential properties.

 

We also originate a limited amount of construction loans to experienced developers, almost exclusively for the construction of residential real estate projects.  Construction loans are also made to individuals for the construction of their personal residences.  Construction loans to individuals are generally “interest-only” loans during the construction period, and convert to permanent, amortizing loans following the completion of construction.  At December 31, 2015, construction loans totaled $7.2 million, or 0.6% of total loans receivable.  At December 31, 2015, the additional unadvanced portion of these construction loans totaled $3.7 million.

 

Construction financing generally involves greater credit risk than long-term financing on improved, owner-occupied real estate.  Risk of loss on a construction loan depends largely upon the accuracy of the initial estimate of the value of the property at completion of construction compared to the estimated cost (including interest) of construction and other assumptions.  If the estimate of construction cost is inaccurate, we may be required to advance additional funds beyond the amount originally committed in order to protect the value of the property.  Moreover, if the estimated value of the completed project is inaccurate, the borrower may hold a property with a value that is insufficient to assure full repayment of the construction loan upon the sale of the property.  In the event we make a land acquisition loan on property that is not yet approved for the planned development, there is the risk that approvals will not be granted or will be delayed.  We currently do not have any land acquisition development and construction loans.  Construction loans also expose us to the risk that improvements will not be completed on time in accordance with specifications and projected costs.  In addition, the ultimate sale or rental of the property may not occur as anticipated.

 

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Loan Originations, Purchases, Sales and Servicing.  All loans that we originate are underwritten pursuant to our policies and procedures, which incorporate standard underwriting guidelines, including those of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, to the extent applicable.  We originate both adjustable-rate and fixed-rate loans.  However, in our market area, customer demand is primarily for fixed-rate loans.  Our loan origination and sales activity may be adversely affected by a rising interest rate environment that typically results in decreased loan demand.  Most of our one- to four-family residential mortgage loan originations are generated by our branch managers and employees located in our banking offices and our additional commissioned loan officers located in our corporate headquarters.  We also advertise throughout our market area.  We also receive loans from mortgage brokers, mortgage bankers and other financial institutions that work with our staff to process and close these loans.  We underwrite and approve all of these loans.

 

We sell loans to assist us in managing interest rate risk.  We sold $56.2 million, $37.5 million and $82.2 million of residential mortgage loans (all fixed-rate loans, with terms of 10 years or longer) during the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  We had six loans totaling $2.1 million classified as held for sale at December 31, 2015.

 

We sell our loans without recourse, except for normal representations and warranties provided in sales transactions.  At December 31, 2015, we were servicing loans owned by others with a principal balance of $51.8 million.  Loan servicing includes collecting and remitting loan payments, accounting for principal and interest, contacting delinquent borrowers, supervising foreclosures and property dispositions in the event of unremedied defaults, making certain insurance and tax payments on behalf of the borrowers and generally administering the loans.  We retain a portion of the interest paid by the borrower on the loans we service as consideration for our servicing activities.  For the year ended December 31, 2015, we received servicing fees of $153,000.  At December 31, 2015, substantially all of the loans serviced for Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae were performing in accordance with their contractual terms and we believe that there are no material repurchase obligations associated with these loans.

 

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority.  Our lending activities follow written, nondiscriminatory underwriting standards and loan origination procedures established by our Board of Directors.  The loan approval process is intended to assess the borrower’s ability to repay the loan and value of the property that will secure the loan.  To assess the borrower’s ability to repay, we review the borrower’s employment and credit history and information on the historical and projected income and expenses of the borrower.

 

Our policies and loan approval limits are established by the Board of Directors.  Aggregate lending relationships in amounts up to $5.0 million can be approved by designated individual officers or officers acting together with specific lending approval authority.  Relationships in excess of $5.0 million require the approval of the Loan Committee of the Board of Directors.

 

Territorial Savings Bank also uses automated systems to underwrite one- to four-family residential mortgage loans with balances up to $625,500.  We require appraisals of all real property securing one- to four-family residential real estate loans, and on property securing home equity loans and lines of credit.  All appraisers are licensed appraisers and all third-party appraisers are approved by the Board of Directors annually.

 

Investments

 

Our Board of Directors has primary responsibility for establishing and overseeing our investment policy.  The Board of Directors has delegated authority to implement the investment policy to our Investment Committee, consisting of our President and Chief Executive Officer, our Vice Chairman and Co-Chief Operating Officer, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and our Vice President and Controller.  The investment policy is reviewed at least annually by the Investment

 

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Committee, and any changes to the policy are subject to approval by the full Board of Directors.  The overall objectives of the Investment Policy are to maintain a portfolio of high quality and diversified investments to maximize interest income over the long term and to minimize risk, to provide collateral for borrowings, to provide additional earnings when loan production is low, and to reduce our tax liability.  The policy dictates that investment decisions give consideration to the safety of principal, liquidity requirements and potential returns.  Our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer executes our securities portfolio transactions as directed by the Investment Committee.  All purchase and sale transactions are reported to the Board of Directors on a monthly basis.

 

Our current investment policy permits investments in securities issued by the United States Government as well as mortgage-backed securities and direct obligations of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and Ginnie Mae.  The investment policy also permits, with certain limitations, investments in certificates of deposit, bank-owned life insurance, collateralized mortgage obligations, trust preferred securities, municipal securities and stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank and the Federal Reserve Bank.  We purchased stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank in order to obtain services such as demand deposit accounts, certificates of deposit, security safekeeping services and borrowings in the form of advances.  As a member of the Federal Reserve System, we are required to hold stock in the Federal Reserve Bank.

 

Our current policies do not permit hedging activities, such as engaging in futures, options or swap transactions, or investing in high-risk mortgage derivatives, such as collateralized mortgage obligation residual interests, real estate mortgage investment conduit residual interests or stripped mortgage-backed securities.  As of December 31, 2015, we held no asset-backed securities other than mortgage-backed securities.  As a state savings bank, Territorial Savings Bank is not permitted to invest in equity securities.  This general restriction does not apply to Territorial Bancorp Inc.

 

The Investments — Debt and Equity Securities topic of the Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification (FASB ASC) requires that, at the time of purchase, we designate a security as either held-to-maturity, available-for-sale, or trading, based upon our ability and intent to hold the security until maturity.  Securities in the available-for-sale and trading classifications are reported at market value and securities in the held-to-maturity classification are reported at amortized cost.  A periodic review and evaluation of the available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities portfolios is conducted to determine if the fair value of any security has declined below its carrying value and whether such decline is other-than-temporary.  If we do not have the intent to sell a security and it is not more likely than not that we will be required to sell a security, impairment occurs when the present value of the remaining cash flows is less than the remaining amortized cost basis.  The difference between the present value of remaining cash flows and the remaining amortized cost basis is considered a credit loss.  If a credit loss has occurred, impairment is recorded by writing down the value of a security to its fair market value as a charge to earnings.  The difference between the write down and the credit loss is considered other comprehensive loss, which is a reduction of stockholders’ equity.

 

Our held-to-maturity securities at December 31, 2015 consisted primarily of securities with the following carrying values: $481.5 million of mortgage-backed securities, $10.7 million of collateralized mortgage obligations and $916,000 of trust preferred securities that were issued by pools of issuers consisting primarily of financial institution holding companies.  At December 31, 2015, all of our mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations were issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae.  At December 31, 2015, there were no securities classified as available-for-sale.  At December 31, 2015, none of the collateral underlying our securities portfolio was considered subprime or Alt-A, and we did not hold any common or preferred stock issued by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae as of that date.  See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Balance Sheet Analysis—Securities” for a discussion of the recent performance of our securities portfolio.  The fair values of our securities are usually based on published or securities dealers’ market values.

 

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Mortgage-backed securities are securities issued in the secondary market that are collateralized by pools of mortgages.  Certain types of mortgage-backed securities are commonly referred to as “pass-through” certificates because the principal and interest of the underlying loans is “passed through” to investors, net of certain costs, including servicing and guarantee fees.  Mortgage-backed securities typically are collateralized by pools of one- to four-family or multi-family mortgages.  We invest primarily in mortgage-backed securities backed by one- to four-family mortgages.  The interest rate of the security is lower than the interest rates of the underlying loans to allow for payment of servicing and guaranty fees.  Ginnie Mae, a United States Government agency, and government sponsored enterprises, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, either guarantee the payments or guarantee the timely payment of principal and interest to investors.  Mortgage-backed securities are more liquid than individual mortgage loans since there is an active trading market for such securities.  In addition, mortgage-backed securities may be used to collateralize our borrowings.  Investments in mortgage-backed securities involve a risk that actual payments will be greater or less than the prepayment rate estimated at the time of purchase, which may require adjustments to the amortization of any premium or accretion of any discount relating to such interests, thereby affecting the net yield on our securities.

 

Sources of Funds

 

General.  Deposits traditionally have been our primary source of funds for our investment and lending activities.  We also borrow from the Federal Home Loan Bank and from securities dealers through securities sold under agreements to repurchase to supplement cash flow needs, to lengthen the maturities of liabilities for interest rate risk management purposes and to manage our cost of funds.  Our additional sources of funds are loan repayments, maturing investments, retained earnings, income on other earning assets and the proceeds of loan and security sales.

 

Deposits.  We accept deposits primarily from the areas in which our offices are located.  We rely on our competitive pricing and products, convenient locations and quality customer service to attract and retain deposits.  We offer a variety of deposit accounts with a range of interest rates and terms.  Our deposit accounts consist of passbook and statement savings accounts, certificates of deposit, money market accounts, commercial and regular checking accounts and Super NOW accounts.  Historically, we have not accepted brokered deposits.

 

Interest rates paid, maturity terms, service fees and withdrawal penalties are established on a periodic basis.  Deposit rates and terms are based primarily on current operating strategies, market interest rates, liquidity requirements and our deposit growth goals.

 

Borrowings.  Our borrowings consist of advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank and funds borrowed from securities sold under agreements to repurchase.  At December 31, 2015, our Federal Home Loan Bank advances totaled $69.0 million, or 4.3% of total liabilities and securities sold under agreements to repurchase totaled $55.0 million, or 3.4% of total liabilities.  At December 31, 2015, we had access to additional Federal Home Loan Bank advances of up to $555.1 million.  Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank are secured by our investment in the common stock of the Federal Home Loan Bank as well as by a blanket pledge on our assets not otherwise pledged.  Securities sold under agreements to repurchase are secured by mortgage-backed securities.

 

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Subsidiary Activities

 

Territorial Savings Bank owns 100% of the common stock of Territorial Financial Services, Inc., a Hawaii corporation that engages primarily in insurance activities.  At December 31, 2015, Territorial Savings Bank’s investment in Territorial Financial Services, Inc. was $12,000, and Territorial Financial Services, Inc. had assets of $78,000 at that date.  Territorial Savings Bank also owns 100% of the common stock of Territorial Real Estate Co., Inc., an inactive Hawaii corporation that is authorized to manage and dispose of problem real estate.

 

Personnel

 

As of December 31, 2015, we had 269 full-time employees and 11 part-time employees.  Our employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group.  Management believes that we have a good working relationship with our employees.

 

FEDERAL AND STATE TAXATION

 

Federal Taxation

 

General.  Territorial Bancorp Inc. and Territorial Savings Bank are subject to federal income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below.  The following discussion of federal taxation is intended only to summarize material federal income tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to Territorial Bancorp Inc. and Territorial Savings Bank.

 

Method of Accounting.  For federal income tax purposes, Territorial Bancorp Inc. currently reports its income and expenses on the accrual method of accounting and uses a tax year ending December 31st for filing its consolidated federal income tax returns.

 

Minimum Tax.  The Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, imposes an alternative minimum tax at a rate of 20% on a base of regular taxable income plus certain tax preferences, referred to as “alternative minimum taxable income.”  The alternative minimum tax is payable to the extent alternative minimum taxable income is in excess of an exemption amount.  Net operating losses can, in general, offset no more than 90% of alternative minimum taxable income.  Certain payments of alternative minimum tax may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years.  At December 31, 2015 and 2014, Territorial Bancorp Inc. had no alternative minimum tax credit carryforward.

 

Net Operating Loss Carryovers.  A financial institution may carry back net operating losses to the preceding two taxable years and forward to the succeeding 20 taxable years.  At December 31, 2015 and 2014, Territorial Savings Bank had no net operating loss carryforward for federal income tax purposes.

 

Corporate Dividends.  We may exclude from our income 100% of dividends received from Territorial Savings Bank as a member of the same affiliated group of corporations.

 

Audit of Tax Returns.  Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s 2011 federal income tax return was audited in 2013.  The audit did not result in any material changes to the federal income tax return.

 

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State Taxation

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc. and Territorial Savings Bank are subject to a franchise tax imposed under Hawaii law at a rate of 7.92% of net income.  The net income to which the tax rate is applied is determined in a manner consistent with the taxable income determined for federal purposes with some adjustments.  The principal adjustment to federal taxable income is the inclusion of interest received on municipal bonds in gross income for Hawaii franchise tax purposes.

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s state franchise tax returns have not been audited in the most recent five-year period.

 

SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

 

General

 

On June 25, 2014, Territorial Savings Bank converted from a federal savings bank to a Hawaii state-chartered savings bank.  In addition, on July 10, 2014, Territorial Savings Bank became a member of the Federal Reserve System.  As a result of these actions, Territorial Savings Bank is examined and supervised by the Hawaii Division of Financial Institutions, as its primary state regulator, and by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, or Federal Reserve Board, as its primary federal regulator.  Territorial Savings Bank is also subject to examination by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, its deposit insurer, under certain circumstances.  This regulation and supervision establishes a comprehensive framework of activities in which an institution may engage and is intended primarily for the protection of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s deposit insurance fund and depositors, and not for the protection of security holders.  Under this system of state and federal regulation, financial institutions are periodically examined to ensure that they satisfy applicable standards with respect to their capital adequacy, assets, management, earnings, liquidity and sensitivity to market interest rates.  The Hawaii Division of Financial Institutions and the Federal Reserve Board examine Territorial Savings Bank and prepare reports for the consideration of the Bank’s Board of Directors on any operating deficiencies.  Territorial Savings Bank’s relationship with its depositors and borrowers also is regulated to a great extent by federal law and, to a much lesser extent, state law, especially in matters concerning the ownership of deposit accounts and the form and content of Territorial Savings Bank’s loan documents.

 

Any change in these laws or regulations, whether by the Hawaii Division of Financial Institutions, the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or Congress, could have a material adverse impact on Territorial Bancorp Inc., Territorial Savings Bank and their operations.

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc. maintained its status as a savings and loan holding company in connection with Territorial Savings Bank’s charter conversion.  Accordingly, Territorial Bancorp Inc. is required to file certain reports with, is subject to examination by, and otherwise must comply with the rules and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board.  Territorial Bancorp Inc. is also subject to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission under the federal securities laws.

 

Certain of the regulatory requirements that are applicable to Territorial Savings Bank and Territorial Bancorp Inc. are described below.  This description of statutes and regulations is not intended to be a complete description of such statutes and regulations and their effects on Territorial Savings Bank and Territorial Bancorp Inc. and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the actual statutes and regulations.

 

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The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”), signed into law in 2010, eliminated our then-primary federal regulator, the Office of Thrift Supervision, by merging the Office of Thrift Supervision into the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the primary federal regulator for national banks). The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency assumed the responsibility for examining, regulating and enforcing laws and regulations against federal savings banks effective July 21, 2011.  The legislation also established a Financial Services Oversight Council and granted the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System exclusive authority to regulate all bank and thrift holding companies.  As a result, Territorial Bancorp Inc. became subject to supervision by the Federal Reserve Board as opposed to the Office of Thrift Supervision.  Compliance with new regulations and being supervised by one or more new regulatory agencies could increase our expenses.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act also created a new agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as an independent bureau of the Federal Reserve Board, to take over the implementation of federal consumer financial protection and fair lending laws from the depository institution regulators.  However, institutions with $10 billion or fewer in assets, such as Territorial Savings Bank, continue to be examined for compliance with such laws and regulations by the Federal Reserve Board, its primary banking regulator, rather than the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act contained the so-called “Volcker Rule,” which generally prohibits banking organizations from engaging in proprietary trading and from investing in, sponsoring or having certain relationships with hedge or private equity funds (“covered funds”).  On December 13, 2013, the federal agencies issued a final rule implementing the Volcker Rule which, among other things, requires banking organizations to restructure and limit certain of their investments in and relationships with covered funds.  The final rule unexpectedly included within the interests subject to its restrictions collateralized debt obligations backed by trust-preferred securities (“TruPS CDOs”).  Many banking organizations, including Territorial Savings Bank, had purchased such instruments because of their favorable tax, accounting and regulatory treatment and would have been subject to unexpected write-downs.  In response to concerns expressed by community banking organizations, the federal agencies subsequently issued an interim final rule which grandfathers TruPS CDOs issued before May 19, 2010 if (i) acquired by a banking organization on or before December 10, 2013 and (ii) the organization reasonably believed the proceeds from the TruPS CDOs were invested primarily in any trust preferred security or subordinated debt instrument issued by a depository institution holding company with less than $15 billion in assets or by a mutual holding company.  Territorial Savings Bank’s investment in TruPS CDOs is grandfathered by these new provisions and is further discussed in this 10-K report.

 

Federal Banking Regulation

 

Capital Requirements.  Federal regulations require federally insured depository institutions to meet several minimum capital standards:  a common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 4.5%, a Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 6.0%, a total capital to risk-based assets ratio of 8%, and a 4% Tier 1 capital to total assets leverage ratio.  The current capital requirements were effective January 1, 2015 and are the result of a final rule implementing recommendations of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BASEL III) and certain requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act.

 

In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets for purposes of calculating risk-based capital ratios, all assets, including certain off-balance sheet assets (e.g., recourse obligations, direct credit substitutes, residual interests) are multiplied by a risk weight factor assigned by the regulations based on the risks believed inherent in the type of asset.  Higher levels of capital are required for asset categories believed to present greater risk.  Common equity Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common stockholders’ equity and retained earnings.  Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common equity Tier 1 and additional Tier 1 capital.  Additional Tier 1 capital includes certain noncumulative perpetual preferred

 

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stock and related surplus and minority interests in equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries.  Total capital includes Tier 1 capital (common equity Tier 1 capital plus additional Tier 1 capital) and Tier 2 capital.  Tier 2 capital is comprised of capital instruments and related surplus, meeting specified requirements, and may include cumulative preferred stock and long-term perpetual preferred stock, mandatory convertible securities, intermediate preferred stock and subordinated debt.  Also included in Tier 2 capital is the allowance for loan and lease losses limited to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets and, for institutions that have exercised an opt-out election regarding the treatment of accumulated other comprehensive income, up to 45% of net unrealized gains on available-for-sale equity securities with readily determinable fair market values.  Calculation of all types of regulatory capital is subject to deductions and adjustments specified in the regulations.  In assessing an institution’s capital adequacy, the Federal Reserve Bank takes into consideration, not only these numeric factors, but qualitative factors as well, and has the authority to establish higher capital requirements for individual institutions where deemed necessary.

 

In addition to establishing the minimum regulatory capital requirements, the regulations limit capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments to management if the institution does not hold a “capital conservation buffer” consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted asset above the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements.  The capital conservation buffer requirement is being phased in beginning January 1, 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and increasing each year until fully implemented at 2.5% on January 1, 2019.

 

At December 31, 2015, Territorial Savings Bank’s regulatory capital was considered to be well capitalized under the revised capital requirements, which became effective on January 1, 2015.

 

Prompt Corrective Action Regulations.  Under prompt corrective action regulations, the Federal Reserve Board is authorized and, under certain circumstances, required to take supervisory actions against undercapitalized member banks.  The extent of supervisory action depends upon the degree of the institution’s undercapitalization.  For this purpose, a member bank is placed in one of the following five categories based on the bank’s capital:

 

·                                          well-capitalized (at least 5% leverage capital, 8% Tier 1 risk-based capital, 10% total risk-based capital and 6.5% common equity Tier 1 risk-based capital);

 

·                                          adequately capitalized (at least 4% leverage capital, 6% Tier 1 risk-based capital, 8% total risk-based capital and 4.5% common equity Tier 1 risk-based capital);

 

·                                          undercapitalized (less than 4% leverage capital, 6% Tier 1 risk-based capital, 8% total risk-based capital or 4.5% common equity Tier 1 risk-based capital);

 

·                                          significantly undercapitalized (less than 3% leverage capital, 4% Tier 1 risk-based capital, 6% total risk-based capital or 3% common equity Tier 1 risk-based capital); and

 

·                                          critically undercapitalized (less than 2% tangible capital).

 

At December 31, 2015, Territorial Savings Bank met the criteria for being considered “well-capitalized.”

 

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Capital Distributions.  Federal Reserve member banks must receive the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board to pay dividends:  (i) in an amount that exceeds the sum of the bank’s net income during the calendar year and retained net income of the prior two calendar years or (ii) that would exceed the bank’s undivided profits.  Even if an application is not otherwise required, every savings bank that is a subsidiary of a savings and loan holding company must file a notice with the Federal Reserve Board at least 30 days before the Board of Directors declares a dividend.

 

The Federal Reserve Board may disapprove a notice or application if:

 

·                                          the savings bank would be undercapitalized following the distribution;

 

·                                          the proposed dividend raises safety and soundness concerns; or

 

·                                          the dividend would violate a prohibition contained in any statute, regulation with a federal banking regulatory agency or any formal or informal enforcement action.

 

In addition, the Federal Deposit Insurance Act provides that an insured depository institution shall not make any capital distribution if, after making such distribution, the institution would be undercapitalized.

 

Community Reinvestment Act and Fair Lending Laws.  All savings banks have a responsibility under the Community Reinvestment Act and related federal regulations to help meet the credit needs of their communities, including low- and moderate-income borrowers.  In connection with its examination of a state member bank, the Federal Reserve Board is required to assess the savings bank’s record of compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act.  In addition, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act prohibit lenders from discriminating in their lending practices on the basis of characteristics specified in those statutes.  A savings bank’s failure to comply with the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act could, at a minimum, result in denial of certain corporate applications such as branches or mergers, or in restrictions on its activities.  The failure to comply with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act could result in enforcement actions by the Federal Reserve Board, as well as other federal regulatory agencies and the Department of Justice.  The Community Reinvestment Act requires all Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-insured institutions to publicly disclose their rating.  Territorial Savings Bank received a “satisfactory” Community Reinvestment Act rating in its most recent federal examination.

 

Insurance of Deposit Accounts.  Territorial Savings Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  Deposit insurance per account owner is $250,000.

 

Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s risk-based assessment system, insured institutions are assigned to one of four risk categories based on supervisory evaluations, regulatory capital levels and certain other factors, with less risky institutions paying lower assessments.  An institution’s assessment rate depends upon the category to which it is assigned, and certain adjustments specified by Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation regulations.  The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation may adjust the scale uniformly, except that no adjustment can deviate more than two basis points from the base scale without notice and comment.  No institution may pay a dividend if in default of the federal deposit insurance assessment.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act required the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to revise its procedures to base its assessments upon total assets less tangible equity instead of deposits. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation finalized a rule, effective April 1, 2011, that changed the assessment range to 2.5 to 45 basis points of total assets less tangible equity.

 

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In addition to the assessment for deposit insurance, institutions are required to make payments on bonds issued in the late 1980s by the Financing Corporation to recapitalize a predecessor deposit insurance fund. That payment is established quarterly and during the quarter ended December 31, 2015, equaled 0.60 basis points of total assets less tangible capital.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act increased the minimum target Deposit Insurance Fund ratio from 1.15% of estimated insured deposits to 1.35% of estimated insured deposits.  The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation must seek to achieve the 1.35% ratio by September 30, 2020.  Insured institutions with assets of $10 billion or more are supposed to fund the increase.  The Dodd-Frank Act eliminated the 1.5% maximum fund ratio, instead leaving it to the discretion of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has exercised that discretion by establishing a long-range fund ratio of 2%.

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has authority to increase insurance assessments. A significant increase in insurance premiums would likely have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of the Bank.  Management cannot predict what insurance assessment rates will be in the future.

 

Federal Home Loan Bank System.  Territorial Savings Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank System, which consists of eleven regional Federal Home Loan Banks.  The Federal Home Loan Bank System provides a central credit facility primarily for member institutions as well as other entities involved in home mortgage lending.  As a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines, Territorial Savings Bank is required to acquire and hold shares of capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank.  As of December 31, 2015, Territorial Savings Bank held $4.8 million of capital stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines and was in compliance with this requirement.

 

Hawaii Banking Regulation

 

Authority granted by Hawaii laws includes accepting and holding deposits, borrowing from any source, making loans and extensions of credit of any kind, investing in service corporation subsidiaries engaged in activities permissible for service corporations of federal savings banks and engaging in other activities that are usual or incidental to the business of a savings bank.  Hawaii law requires that at least 50% of a savings bank’s loans and extensions of credit be secured by real estate.  In addition, certain commercial loans are limited to 15% of the savings bank’s assets and education loans are limited to 10% of assets.

 

Hawaii law generally limits a savings bank’s capital distributions to the amount of its retained earnings.

 

Hawaii has a parity statute, which provides Hawaii savings banks with authority to engage in any activity permitted by federal law for federal savings banks, upon receiving the approval of the Commissioner.  Territorial Savings Bank received such approval when it converted from a federal savings bank to a Hawaii savings bank.

 

Other Regulations

 

Territorial Savings Bank’s operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

 

·                                          Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

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·                                          Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, requiring that borrowers for mortgage loans for one- to four-family residential real estate receive various disclosures, including good faith estimates of settlement costs, lender servicing and escrow account practices, and prohibiting certain practices that increase the cost of settlement services;

 

·                                          Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

·                                          Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

·                                          Fair Credit Reporting Act, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

·                                          fair lending laws;

 

·                                          Unfair or Deceptive Acts or Practices (“UDAP”) laws and regulations;

 

·                                          Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies;

 

·                                          Truth in Savings Act; and

 

·                                          rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

 

The operations of Territorial Savings Bank are further subject to the:

 

·                                          Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

·                                          Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services;

 

·                                          Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which gives “substitute checks,” such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check;

 

·                                          The USA PATRIOT Act, which requires savings banks to, among other things, establish broadened anti-money laundering compliance programs, due diligence policies and controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering.  Such required compliance programs are intended to supplement existing compliance requirements, also applicable to financial institutions, under the Bank Secrecy Act and the Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations; and

 

·                                          The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which places limitations on the sharing of consumer financial information by financial institutions with unaffiliated third parties.  Specifically, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act requires all financial institutions offering financial products or services to retail customers to provide such customers with the financial institution’s privacy policy and provide such customers the opportunity to “opt out” of the sharing of certain personal financial information with unaffiliated third parties.

 

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Holding Company Regulation

 

General.  Territorial Bancorp Inc. is a nondiversified savings and loan holding company within the meaning of the Home Owners’ Loan Act.  As such, Territorial Bancorp Inc. is registered with the Federal Reserve Board and subject to Federal Reserve Board regulations, examinations, supervision and reporting requirements.  In addition, the Federal Reserve Board has enforcement authority over Territorial Bancorp Inc. and its subsidiaries.  Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Board to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a serious risk to the subsidiary savings institution.  The Dodd-Frank Act regulatory restructuring transferred the responsibility for regulating and supervising savings and loan holding companies from the Office of Thrift Supervision to the Federal Reserve Board, effective July 21, 2011.

 

Permissible Activities.  The business activities of Territorial Bancorp Inc. are generally limited to those activities permissible for financial holding companies under Section 4(k) of the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, or for multiple savings and loan holding companies.  A financial holding company may engage in activities that are financial in nature, including underwriting equity securities and insurance as well as activities that are incidental to financial activities or complementary to a financial activity.  The Dodd-Frank Act added that any savings and loan holding company that engages in activities permissible for a financial holding company must meet the qualitative requirements for a bank holding company to be a financial holding company and conduct the activities in accordance with the requirements that would apply to a financial holding company’s conduct of the activity.  A multiple savings and loan holding company is generally limited to activities permissible for bank holding companies under Section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act, subject to the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Board, and certain additional activities authorized by Federal Reserve Board regulations.

 

Federal law prohibits a savings and loan holding company, including Territorial Bancorp Inc., directly or indirectly, or through one or more subsidiaries, from acquiring more than 5% of another savings institution or holding company thereof, without prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Board.  It also prohibits the acquisition or retention of, with certain exceptions, more than 5% of a nonsubsidiary company engaged in activities that are not closely related to banking or financial in nature, or acquiring or retaining control of an institution that is not federally insured.  In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings institutions, the Federal Reserve Board must consider the financial and managerial resources, future prospects of the company and institution involved, the effect of the acquisition on the risk to the federal deposit insurance fund, the convenience and needs of the community and competitive factors.

 

The Federal Reserve Board is prohibited from approving any acquisition that would result in a multiple savings and loan holding company controlling savings institutions in more than one state, subject to two exceptions:

 

(i)                                     the approval of interstate supervisory acquisitions by savings and loan holding companies; and

 

(ii)                                  the acquisition of a savings institution in another state if the laws of the state of the target savings institution specifically permit such acquisition.

 

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The states vary in the extent to which they permit interstate savings and loan holding company acquisitions.

 

Capital.  Savings and loan holding companies have historically not been subject to specific regulatory capital requirements.  The Dodd-Frank Act required the Federal Reserve Board to promulgate consolidated capital requirements for depository institution holding companies that are no less stringent, both quantitatively and in terms of components of capital, than those applicable to institutions themselves.  Instruments such as cumulative preferred stock and trust preferred securities are no longer includable as Tier 1 capital, as was previously the case with bank holding companies, subject to certain grandfathering.  The previously discussed final rule regarding regulatory capital requirements implements this Dodd-Frank Act requirement as to savings and loan holding companies.  Consolidated regulatory capital requirements identical to those applicable to the subsidiary depository institutions applied to savings and loan holding companies as of January 1, 2015.  As is the case with institutions themselves, the capital conservation buffer for savings and loan holding companies will be phased in between 2016 and 2019.

 

Source of Strength.  The Dodd-Frank Act also extended the “source of strength” doctrine to savings and loan holding companies.  The Federal Reserve Board has issued regulations requiring that all bank and savings and loan holding companies serve as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

 

Dividends and Stock Repurchases.  The Federal Reserve Board has issued a policy statement regarding the payment of dividends and the repurchase of shares of common stock by bank and savings and loan holding companies.  In general, the policy provides that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if the prospective rate of earnings retention by the holding company appears consistent with the organization’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition.  Regulatory guidance provides for prior regulatory review of capital distributions in certain circumstances, such as where the company’s net income for the past four quarters, net of dividends previously paid over that period, is insufficient to fully fund the dividend.  The guidance also provides for prior regulatory review where the company’s overall rate of earnings retention is inconsistent with the company’s capital needs and overall financial condition.  The ability of a holding company to pay dividends may be restricted if a subsidiary bank becomes undercapitalized.  The policy statement also provides for regulatory review prior to a holding company redeeming or repurchasing regulatory capital instruments when the holding company is experiencing financial weaknesses or redeeming or repurchasing common stock or perpetual preferred stock that would result in a net reduction in the amount of such equity instruments outstanding as of the end of a quarter compared with the beginning of the quarter in which the redemption or repurchase occurred.  These regulatory policies could affect the ability of Territorial Bancorp Inc. to pay dividends, repurchase shares of common stock or otherwise engage in capital distributions.

 

Change in Control Regulations

 

Under the Change in Bank Control Act, no person may acquire control of a savings and loan holding company such as the Company unless the Federal Reserve Board has been given 60 days’ prior written notice and has not issued a notice disapproving the proposed acquisition, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of the acquirer and the competitive effects of the acquisition.  Control, as defined under federal law, means ownership, control of or holding irrevocable proxies representing more than 25% of any class of voting stock, control in any manner of the election of a majority of the company’s directors, or a determination by the regulator that the acquirer has the power to direct, or directly or indirectly to exercise a controlling influence over, the management or policies of the institution.  Acquisition of more than 10% of any class of a savings and loan holding company’s voting stock constitutes a rebuttable presumption of control under the regulations under certain circumstances including where, as is the case with Territorial Bancorp Inc., the issuer has registered securities under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

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Federal Securities Laws

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s common stock is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  Territorial Bancorp Inc. is subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Territorial Bancorp Inc. common stock held by persons who are affiliates (generally officers, directors and principal shareholders) of Territorial Bancorp Inc. may not be resold without registration unless sold in accordance with certain resale restrictions.  If Territorial Bancorp Inc. meets specified current public information requirements, each affiliate of Territorial Bancorp Inc. is able to sell in the public market, without registration, a limited number of shares in any three-month period.

 

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 addresses, among other issues, corporate governance, auditing and accounting, executive compensation, and enhanced and timely disclosure of corporate information. We have prepared policies, procedures and systems designed to ensure compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and related regulations.

 

ITEM 1A.                 Risk Factors

 

Historically low interest rates may adversely affect our net interest income and profitability.

 

In recent years it has been the policy of the Federal Reserve Board to maintain interest rates at historically low levels through its targeted federal funds rate and the purchase of mortgage-backed securities. As a result, interest rates on the loans we have originated and the yields on securities we have purchased have been at lower levels than available prior to 2008. As a general matter, our interest-bearing liabilities reprice or mature more quickly than our interest-earning assets, which has been one factor contributing to the increase in our interest rate spread as interest rates decreased.  However, our ability to lower our interest expense continues to be limited since our cost of funds at December 31, 2015 is relatively low while the average yield on our interest-earning assets may continue to decrease as our higher yielding loans and securities are paid off.  Accordingly, our net interest income may be adversely affected and may even decrease, which may have an adverse effect on our profitability.

 

Future changes in interest rates could reduce our profits.

 

Our ability to make a profit largely depends on our net interest income, which could be negatively affected by changes in interest rates.  Net interest income is the difference between:

 

·                                          the interest income we earn on our interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities; and

 

·                                          the interest expense we pay on our interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings.

 

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As a result of our focus on one- to four-family residential real estate loans and the low demand for adjustable-rate loans in our market area, the interest rates we earn on our loans are generally fixed for long periods of time.  Additionally, many of our securities investments are of long maturities with fixed interest rates.  Like many savings institutions, our focus on deposit accounts as a source of funds, which have no stated maturity date or shorter contractual maturities than loans, results in our liabilities having a shorter duration than our assets.  For example, as of December 31, 2015, 93.5% of our loans had maturities of 15 years or longer, while 73.7% of our certificates of deposits had maturities of one year or less.  This imbalance can create significant earnings volatility, because market interest rates change over time.  In a period of rising interest rates, the interest income earned on our assets, such as loans and investments, likely will not increase as rapidly as the interest paid on our liabilities, such as deposits.  In a period of declining interest rates, the interest income earned on our assets likely will decrease more rapidly than the interest paid on our liabilities, as borrowers prepay mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities, thereby requiring us to reinvest these cash flows at lower interest rates.  See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Management of Market Risk.”

 

In addition, changes in interest rates can affect the average life of loans and mortgage-backed and related securities and the fair value of mortgage servicing assets.  A reduction in interest rates results in increased prepayments of loans and mortgage-backed and related securities, as borrowers refinance their debt in order to reduce their borrowing costs. This creates reinvestment risk, which is the risk that we may not be able to reinvest prepayments at rates that are comparable to the rates we earned on the prepaid loans or securities. Additionally, increases in interest rates may decrease loan demand and/or make it more difficult for borrowers to repay adjustable-rate loans.  Potential reduction, or impairment, to the fair value of mortgage servicing assets generally occurs as market interest rates decline.  Alternatively, an increase in market interest rates generally causes an increase in the fair value of mortgage servicing assets.

 

Changes in interest rates also affect the current fair value of our interest-earning securities portfolio.  Generally, the value of securities moves inversely with changes in interest rates.  At December 31, 2015, the fair value of our investment in held-to-maturity securities totaled $498.0 million.  Net unrealized gains on these securities totaled $4.9 million at December 31, 2015.

 

At December 31, 2015, our “rate shock” analysis indicated that our economic value of equity (the difference between the market value of our assets and the market value of our liabilities with adjustments made for off-balance sheet items) would decrease by $9.7 million if there was an instantaneous 200 basis point increase in market interest rates.  See “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Management of Market Risk.”

 

Our lending activities provide lower interest rates than financial institutions that originate more commercial loans.

 

Our principal lending activity consists of originating one- to four-family residential real estate mortgage loans.  As of December 31, 2015, these loans totaled $1.146 billion or 95.9% of total loans.  We originate our loans with a focus on limiting credit risk and not to generate the highest return or create the greatest difference between the yield on our interest-earning assets and our cost of funds (interest rate spread).

 

Residential real estate mortgage loans generally have lower interest rates than commercial business loans, commercial real estate loans and consumer loans.  As a result, we may generate lower interest rate spreads and rates of return when compared to our competitors who originate more consumer or commercial loans than we do.  We intend to continue our focus on residential real estate lending.

 

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We could record future losses on our holding of a trust preferred security that we purchased from an issuer pool consisting primarily of financial institution holding companies.  In addition, we may not receive full future principal or interest payments, or both, on this security.

 

We owned a share of trust preferred security PreTSL XXIII with an adjusted cost basis and fair value of $916,000 at December 31, 2015.  PreTSL XXIII is a debt obligations issued by an issuer pool (Preferred Term Securities XXIII, Ltd. co-marketed by Keefe, Bruyette & Woods, Inc. and FTN Financial Capital Markets) consisting primarily of holding companies for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-insured financial institutions.  This security is a Class D security, and was originated with a credit rating of BBB.  As of December 31, 2015, PreTSL XXIII is rated C by Fitch.

 

Our investment in PreTSL XXIII was determined to be other-than-temporarily impaired as the present value of cash flows was lower than the amortized cost basis of the security.  We recorded an impairment charge of $2.4 million in the year ended December 31, 2010.  When the impairment charge of $2.4 million on PreTSL XXIII was recorded, the security was written down to its fair value of $32,000.  The book value of our investment in PreTSL XXIII has risen from $32,000 to $916,000 based on an increase in fair value which has occurred with an increase in the present value of cash flows from this security.  The $1.1 million difference between the original outstanding principal balance of $3.5 million and the impairment charge of $2.4 million was reported as other comprehensive loss and is related to noncredit factors such as an inactive trust preferred securities market.

 

It is reasonably possible that the fair value of PreTSL XXIII could decline in the near term if the overall economy and the financial condition of some of the issuers deteriorate further and the liquidity of this security remains low.  As a result, there is a risk that the Company’s remaining amortized cost basis of $1.1 million in PreTSL XXIII could be credit-related other-than-temporarily impaired in the near term.  The impairment could be material to the Company’s consolidated statement of income.

 

A number of factors or combinations of factors could cause us to conclude in one or more future reporting periods that an unrealized loss that exists with respect to PreTSL XXIII constitutes an impairment that is other than temporary, which could result in material losses to us.  These factors include, but are not limited to, continued failure to make scheduled interest or principal payments, an increase in the severity of the unrealized loss, an increase in the continuous duration of the unrealized loss without an improvement in value or changes in market conditions and/or industry or issuer specific factors that would render us unable to forecast a full recovery in value.  In addition, the fair value of PreTSL XXIII could decline if the overall economy and the financial condition of some of the issuers deteriorate further and there remains limited liquidity for this security.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2015, we received no interest payments on the trust preferred security.  The continued failure of the trust preferred issuers to make interest payments for any quarter will reduce our earnings during that quarter.

 

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The following table sets forth information with respect to this security as of December 31, 2015:

 

Pool Deal
Name

 

Book Value

 

Fair Value

 

Unrealized
Gain

 

Credit
Rating

 

Number of
Financial
Institutions
in Pool

 

Deferrals
and
Defaults as
a % of
Collateral

 

Excess
Subordination
(1)

 

 

 

(Dollars in Thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PreTSL XXIII

 

$

916

 

$

916

 

$

 

C

 

101

 

21.9

%

$

 

 


(1)          Estimated present value of future cash flows in excess of amortized cost basis, assuming that 50% of the security collateral is called in the 10th year following issuance.

 

Changes in governmental programs or continuation and/or worsening of prevailing economic conditions could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

In October 2014, the Federal Reserve Board reported that conditions in the labor market have improved and the nation’s unemployment rate has declined.  Household spending has risen moderately and business investment is advancing while the recovery in the housing market remains slow.  The Federal Reserve Board also indicated in October 2014 that it would no longer be buying mortgage-backed securities to increase the size of its securities portfolio.  The Federal Reserve Board will continue to reinvest principal repayments on its securities portfolio into mortgage-backed securities.  The change in the Federal Reserve Board’s securities purchase program could result in higher interest rates and reduced economic activity.  Moreover, a return to prolonged deteriorating economic conditions could significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the value of our loans and investments, and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability.  Declines in real estate values and sales volumes and increases in unemployment levels may result in greater loan delinquencies, increases in our nonperforming, criticized and classified assets and a decline in demand for our products and services. These events may cause us to incur losses and may adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Changes in laws and regulations and the cost of regulatory compliance with new laws and regulations may adversely affect our operations and our income.

 

In response to the developments described above, Congress has taken actions that are intended to strengthen confidence and encourage liquidity in financial institutions, and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has taken actions to increase insurance coverage on deposit accounts.  In addition, there have been proposals made by members of Congress and others that would reduce the amount distressed borrowers are otherwise contractually obligated to pay under their mortgage loans and limit an institution’s ability to foreclose on mortgage collateral.

 

The potential exists for additional federal or state laws and regulations, or changes in policy, regarding lending and funding practices and liquidity standards, and bank regulatory agencies are expected to be active in responding to concerns and trends identified in examinations, including the expected issuance of many formal enforcement orders.  Bank regulatory agencies, such as the Federal Reserve Board, the Hawaii Division of Financial Institutions and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, govern the activities in which we may engage, primarily for the protection of depositors, and not for the protection or benefit of potential investors.  In addition, new laws, regulations and other regulatory changes may increase our costs of regulatory compliance and of doing business, and otherwise

 

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affect our operations.  New laws, regulations, and other regulatory changes may significantly affect the markets in which we do business, the markets for and value of our loans and investments, and our ongoing operations, costs and profitability.  Federal and state proposals limiting our rights as a creditor could result in credit losses or increased expense in pursuing our remedies as a creditor.

 

Nonresidential real estate loans and commercial business loans increase our exposure to credit risks.

 

At December 31, 2015, our portfolio of commercial real estate, construction and other nonresidential real estate loans totaled $19.3 million, or 1.6% of total loans.  In addition, at December 31, 2015, our portfolio of commercial business loans totaled $3.8 million, or 0.3% of total loans.  These loans generally expose us to a greater risk of nonpayment and loss than residential real estate loans because repayment of such loans often depends on the successful operations and income stream of the borrowers.  Additionally, such loans typically involve larger loan balances to single borrowers or groups of related borrowers compared to residential real estate loans.

 

We target our business lending and marketing strategy towards small- to medium-sized businesses.  These small- to medium-sized businesses generally have fewer financial resources in terms of capital or borrowing capacity than larger entities.  If general economic conditions adversely affect these businesses, our results of operations and financial condition may be negatively impacted.  In addition, some of our commercial business loans are collateralized by a security interest in furniture, fixtures and equipment and the liquidation of collateral in the event of default is often an insufficient source of repayment because the collateral may have limited use or value.

 

Strong competition within our market areas may limit our growth and profitability.

 

Competition in the banking and financial services industry is intense.  In our market areas, we compete with commercial banks, savings institutions, mortgage brokerage firms, credit unions, finance companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, and brokerage and investment banking firms operating locally.  Some of our competitors have greater name recognition and market presence that benefit them in attracting business, and offer certain services that we do not or cannot provide.  In addition, larger competitors may be able to price loans and deposits more aggressively than we do, which could affect our ability to grow and remain profitable on a long-term basis.  Our profitability depends upon our continued ability to successfully compete in our market areas.  If we must raise interest rates paid on deposits or lower interest rates charged on our loans, our net interest margin and profitability could be adversely affected.  For additional information see “Item 1. Business—Competition.”

 

If our allowance for loan losses is not sufficient to cover actual loan losses, our earnings will decrease.

 

We make various assumptions and judgments about the collectability of our loan portfolio, including the creditworthiness of our borrowers and the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral for the repayment of many of our loans.  In determining the amount of the allowance for loan losses, we review our loans and our loss and delinquency experience, and we evaluate economic conditions.  If our assumptions are incorrect, our allowance for loan losses may not be sufficient to cover probable incurred losses in our loan portfolio, resulting in additions to our allowance.  While our allowance for loan losses was 0.2% of total loans at December 31, 2015, material additions to our allowance could materially decrease our net income.

 

In addition, bank regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our provision for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs.  Any increase in our allowance for loan losses or loan charge-offs as required by these regulatory authorities might have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Our employee stock ownership plan may continue to increase our costs, which would reduce our income.

 

Our employee stock ownership plan purchased 8% of the total shares of common stock sold in our stock offering using funds borrowed from Territorial Bancorp Inc. We record annual employee stock ownership plan expense in an amount equal to the fair value of the shares of common stock released to employees over the term of the loan.  If the value of the shares of common stock continues to appreciate up to the time shares are released, compensation expense relating to the employee stock ownership plan will increase and our net income will decline.

 

Our 2010 Equity Incentive Plan has increased our expenses and reduced our income, and may dilute your ownership interests.

 

In August 2010, our stockholders approved the Territorial Bancorp Inc. 2010 Equity Incentive Plan.  Stockholders approved the issuance of 736,434 shares of common stock pursuant to restricted stock and the issuance of 976,203 shares of common stock pursuant to stock options.  During 2015, we recognized $2.7 million in noninterest expense relating to this stock benefit plan.

 

We may fund the 2010 Equity Incentive Plan either through open market purchases or from the issuance of authorized but unissued shares of common stock.  Our ability to repurchase shares of common stock to fund this plan will be subject to many factors, including, but not limited to, applicable regulatory restrictions on stock repurchases, the availability of stock in the market, the trading price of the stock, our capital levels, alternative uses for our capital and our financial performance.  Our intention is to fund the plan through open market purchases and we have repurchased 3,099,253 shares as of December 31, 2015.  However, stockholders would experience a reduction in ownership interest in the event newly issued shares of our common stock are used to fund stock options and restricted stock awards.

 

Concentration of loans in our primary market area may increase risk.

 

Our success depends primarily on the general economic conditions in the State of Hawaii, as nearly all of our loans are to customers in the state.  Accordingly, the economic conditions in the State of Hawaii have a significant impact on the ability of borrowers to repay loans as well as our ability to originate new loans.  As such, a decline in real estate valuations in this market would lower the value of the collateral securing those loans.  In addition, significant weakening in general economic conditions such as inflation, recession, unemployment or other factors beyond our control could negatively affect our financial results.

 

Our local economy relies heavily on the tourism industry.  Downturns in this industry could affect our operations and results.

 

Tourism is the largest sector of Hawaii’s economy.  The Hawaii Tourism Authority reported visitor arrivals and visitor spending grew by 4.1% and 2.3%, respectively, in 2015 compared to 2014.  A downturn in the tourism industry, and the related loss of jobs or operating income for businesses, could have a significant impact on our ability to originate loans, and the ability of borrowers to repay loans, either of which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

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Proposed reductions in defense spending by the federal government could have a detrimental impact on Hawaii’s economy.

 

The defense industry is the second largest contributor to Hawaii’s economy after the visitor industry, contributing $7.6 billion and creating thousands of jobs for residents of the State.  The amount spent by the defense industry represents 9.9% of the State’s gross domestic product. Proposals to cut defense and other general spending could have an adverse impact on Hawaii’s economy, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are subject to extensive regulatory oversight.

 

We and our subsidiaries are subject to extensive regulation and supervision.  Regulators have intensified their focus on bank lending criteria and controls, and on the USA PATRIOT Act’s anti-money laundering and Bank Secrecy Act compliance requirements.  There also is increased scrutiny of our compliance practices generally and particularly with the rules enforced by the Office of Foreign Assets Control.  Our failure to comply with these and other regulatory requirements could lead to, among other remedies, administrative enforcement actions and legal proceedings.  In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act and implementing regulations are likely to have a significant effect on the financial services industry, which are likely to increase operating costs and reduce profitability.  Regulatory or legislative changes could make regulatory compliance more difficult or expensive for us, and could cause us to change or limit some of our products and services, or the way we operate our business.

 

Severe weather, natural disasters and other external events could significantly affect our operations and results.

 

Because all of our office locations are in the State of Hawaii, severe weather or natural disasters, such as tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes and earthquakes and other adverse external events, could have a significant effect on our ability to conduct business.  Such events could affect the stability of our deposit base, impair the ability of borrowers to repay outstanding loans, impair the value of collateral securing loans, cause significant property damage, result in loss of revenue and/or cause us to incur additional expenses.  Natural disasters, like the tsunami that occurred in Japan in 2011, could have an impact on the visitor industry in Hawaii.  Accordingly, the occurrence of any such severe weather or natural disaster event could have a material adverse effect on our business, which, in turn, could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We have become subject to more stringent capital requirements, which may adversely impact our return on equity, require us to raise additional capital, or constrain us from paying dividends or repurchasing shares.

 

A final capital rule that became effective for financial institutions on January 1, 2015, includes new minimum risk-based capital and leverage ratios, and refines the definition of what constitutes “capital” for purposes of calculating these ratios.  The new minimum capital requirements are: (i) a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5%; (ii) a Tier 1 to risk-based assets capital ratio of 6% (increased from 4%); (iii) a total capital ratio of 8% (unchanged from current rules); and (iv) a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 4%. The final rule also establishes a “capital conservation buffer” of 2.5%, and will result in the following minimum ratios: (i) a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 7.0%, (ii) a Tier 1 to risk-based assets capital ratio of 8.5%, and (iii) a total capital ratio of 10.5%. The new capital conservation buffer requirement is being phased in beginning in January 2016 at 0.625% of risk-weighted assets and increases each year until fully implemented in January 2019. An institution will be subject to limitations on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases, and paying discretionary bonuses if its capital level falls below the buffer amount. These limitations will establish a maximum percentage of eligible retained income that can be utilized for such actions.

 

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Territorial Savings Bank and Territorial Bancorp Inc. met all of these new requirements, including the full 2.5% capital conservation buffer, as if these new requirements had been fully phased in as of December 31, 2015.

 

The application of more stringent capital requirements could, among other things, result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, and result in regulatory actions if we were to be unable to comply with such requirements.  Furthermore, the imposition of liquidity requirements in connection with the implementation of Basel III could result in our having to lengthen the term of our funding, restructure our business models, and/or increase our holdings of liquid assets.  Implementation of changes to asset risk weightings for risk-based capital calculations, items included or deducted in calculating regulatory capital and/or additional capital conservation buffers could result in management modifying its business strategy, and could limit our ability to make distributions, including paying out dividends or buying back shares.  Specifically, beginning in 2016, Territorial Savings Bank’s ability to pay dividends will be limited if it does not have the capital conservation buffer required by the new capital rules, which may limit our ability to pay dividends to stockholders.  See “Supervision and Regulation—Federal Banking Regulation—Capital Distributions.”

 

Territorial Savings Bank became a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco in July 2014.  The Federal Reserve Bank, as a condition of membership, requires that Territorial Savings Bank maintain a Tier 1 capital ratio of at least 9.0% for the next three years.

 

Government responses to economic conditions may adversely affect our operations, financial condition and earnings.

 

Newly enacted financial reform legislation has changed the bank regulatory framework, creating an independent consumer protection bureau that will assume the consumer protection responsibilities of the various federal banking agencies, and establish more stringent capital standards for banks and bank holding companies.  The legislation has resulted in new regulations affecting the lending, funding, trading and investment activities of banks and bank holding companies.  Bank regulatory agencies also have been responding aggressively to concerns and adverse trends identified in examinations.  Ongoing uncertainty and adverse developments in the financial services industry and the domestic and international credit markets, and the effect of new legislation and regulatory actions in response to these conditions, may adversely affect our operations by restricting our business activities, including our ability to originate or sell loans, modify loan terms, or foreclose on property securing loans.  These measures are likely to increase our costs of doing business and may have a significant adverse effect on our lending activities, financial performance and operating flexibility.  In addition, these risks could affect the performance and value of our loan and investment securities portfolios, which also would negatively affect our financial performance.

 

Furthermore, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, in an attempt to help the overall economy, has, among other things, kept interest rates low through its targeted federal funds rate and the purchase of mortgage-backed securities.  If the Federal Reserve Board increases the federal funds rate, overall interest rates will likely rise, which may negatively impact the housing markets and the U.S. economic recovery.  In addition, deflationary pressures, while possibly lowering our operating costs, could have a significant negative effect on our borrowers, especially our business borrowers, and the values of underlying collateral securing loans, which could negatively affect our financial performance.

 

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Noncompliance with the USA PATRIOT Act, Bank Secrecy Act, or other laws and regulations could result in fines or sanctions.

 

The USA PATRIOT and Bank Secrecy Acts require financial institutions to develop programs to prevent financial institutions from being used for money laundering and terrorist activities.  If such activities are detected, financial institutions are obligated to file suspicious activity reports with the U.S. Treasury’s Office of Financial Crimes Enforcement Network.  These rules require financial institutions to establish procedures for identifying and verifying the identity of customers seeking to open new financial accounts.  Failure to comply with these regulations could result in fines or sanctions.  During the last year, several banking institutions have received large fines for non-compliance with these laws and regulations.  While we have developed policies and procedures designed to assist in compliance with these laws and regulations, these policies and procedures may not be effective in preventing violations of these laws and regulations.

 

The building of market share through de novo branching could cause our expenses to increase faster than revenues.

 

We intend to continue to build market share in the State of Hawaii through de novo branching.  Since 2010, we have opened three de novo branches including the most recent branch opened in 2013.  There are considerable costs involved in opening branches that generally require a period of time to generate the necessary revenues to offset their costs, especially in areas in which we do not have an established presence.  Accordingly, any such business expansion can be expected to negatively impact our earnings for some period of time until certain economies of scale are reached.  Our expenses could be further increased if we encounter delays in the opening of any of our new branches.  Finally, our business expansion may not be successful after establishment.

 

System failure or breaches of our network security could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation and other liabilities.

 

The computer systems and network infrastructure we use could be vulnerable to unforeseen problems.  Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer equipment against damage from physical theft, fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or a similar catastrophic event, as well as from security breaches, denial of service attacks, viruses, worms and other disruptive problems caused by hackers.  Any damage or failure that causes an interruption in our operations could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.  Computer break-ins, phishing and other disruptions could also jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure, which may result in significant liability to us and may cause existing and potential customers to refrain from doing business with us.  Although we, with the help of third-party service providers, intend to continue to implement security technology and establish operational procedures to prevent such damage, these security measures may not be successful.  In addition, advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other developments could result in a compromise or breach of the algorithms we and our third-party service providers use to encrypt and protect customer transaction data.  A failure of such security measures could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

We mitigate this risk through guidance promulgated for all financial institutions by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council and the regulations issued under the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act.  This guidance also requires our core data processor to meet these standards.  We regularly self-audit or review exams from auditors as well as federal banking regulators to assure that these standards are being met, internally as well as by our important data processing vendors. We also implemented firewall and other internal controls to protect our systems from compromise.

 

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Nevertheless, our system could be compromised and it is possible that significant amounts of time and money may be spent to rectify the harm caused by a breach or hack. While we have general liability insurance and cyber liability insurance, we know there are limitations on coverage as well as dollar amount.  Furthermore, cyber incidents carry a greater risk of injury to our reputation.  Finally, depending on the type of incident, banking regulators can impose restrictions on our business and consumer laws may require reimbursement of customer loss.

 

Our risk management framework may not be effective in mitigating risk and reducing the potential for significant losses.

 

Our risk management framework is designed to minimize risk and loss to us. We seek to identify, measure, monitor, report and control our exposure to risk, including strategic, market, liquidity, compliance and operational risks. While we use a broad and diversified set of risk monitoring and mitigation techniques, these techniques are inherently limited because they cannot anticipate the existence or future development of currently unanticipated or unknown risks.  Recent economic conditions and heightened legislative and regulatory scrutiny of the financial services industry, among other developments, have increased our level of risk. Accordingly, we could suffer losses as a result of our failure to properly anticipate and manage these risks.

 

Our business may be adversely affected by an increasing prevalence of fraud, including cyberfraud, and other financial crimes.

 

Our loans to businesses and individuals and our deposit relationships and related transactions are subject to exposure to the risk of loss due to fraud, including cyberfraud, and other financial crimes.  Nationally, reported incidents of fraud and other financial crimes have increased.  We have also experienced losses due to apparent fraud and other financial crimes.  While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent such losses, losses may still occur.

 

Legal and regulatory proceedings and related matters could adversely affect us or the financial services industry in general.

 

We, and other participants in the financial services industry upon whom we rely to operate, have been and may in the future become involved in legal and regulatory proceedings.  Most of the proceedings we consider to be in the normal course of our business or typical for the industry; however, it is inherently difficult to assess the outcome of these matters, and other participants in the financial services industry or we may not prevail in any proceeding or litigation.  There could be substantial cost and management diversion in such litigation and proceedings, and any adverse determination could have a materially adverse effect on our business, brand or image, or our financial condition and results of our operations.

 

We are a community bank and our ability to maintain our reputation is critical to the success of our business and the failure to do so may materially adversely affect our performance.

 

We are a community bank, and our reputation is one of the most valuable components of our business.  A key component of our business strategy is to rely on our reputation for customer service and knowledge of local markets to expand our presence by capturing new business opportunities from existing and prospective customers in our current market and contiguous areas.  As such, we strive to conduct our business in a manner that enhances our reputation. This is done, in part, by recruiting, hiring and retaining employees who share our core values of being an integral part of the communities we serve, delivering superior service to our customers and caring about our customers and associates.  If our reputation is

 

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negatively affected, by the actions of our employees, by our inability to conduct our operations in a manner that is appealing to current or prospective customers, or otherwise, our business and operating results may be adversely affected.

 

The corporate governance provisions in our articles of incorporation and bylaws, and the corporate governance provisions under Maryland law, may prevent or impede the holders of our common stock from obtaining representation on our Board of Directors and may impede takeovers of the company that our board might conclude are not in the best interest of Territorial Bancorp Inc. or its stockholders.

 

Provisions in our articles of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or impede holders of our common stock from obtaining representation on our Board of Directors and may make takeovers of Territorial Bancorp Inc. more difficult.  For example, our Board of Directors is divided into three staggered classes.  A classified board makes it more difficult for stockholders to change a majority of the directors because it generally takes at least two annual elections of directors for this to occur.  Our articles of incorporation include a provision that no person will be entitled to vote any shares of our common stock in excess of 10% of our outstanding shares of common stock.  This limitation does not apply to the purchase of shares by a tax-qualified employee stock benefit plan established by us.  In addition, our articles of incorporation and bylaws restrict who may call special meetings of stockholders and how directors may be removed from office.  Additionally, in certain instances, the Maryland General Corporation Law requires a supermajority vote of our stockholders to approve a merger or other business combination with a large stockholder, if the proposed transaction is not approved by a majority of our directors.

 

Final regulations could restrict our ability to originate and sell loans.

 

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has issued a rule designed to clarify for lenders how they can avoid legal liability under the Dodd-Frank Act, which would hold lenders accountable for ensuring a borrower’s ability to repay a mortgage. Loans that meet this “qualified mortgage” definition will be presumed to have complied with the new ability-to-repay standard.  Under the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s rule, a “qualified mortgage” loan must not contain certain specified features, including:

 

·                                          excessive upfront points and fees (those exceeding 3% of the total loan amount, less “bona fide discount points” for prime loans);

 

·                                          interest-only payments;

 

·                                          negative-amortization; or

 

·                                          terms longer than 30 years.

 

Also, to qualify as a “qualified mortgage”, a loan must be made to a borrower whose total monthly debt-to-income ratio does not exceed 43%.  Lenders must also verify and document the income and financial resources relied upon to qualify the borrower on the loan and underwrite the loan based on a fully amortizing payment schedule and maximum interest rate during the first five years, taking into account all applicable taxes, insurance and assessments.

 

In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act requires the regulatory agencies to issue regulations that require securitizers of loans to retain “not less than 5% of the credit risk for any asset that is not a qualified residential mortgage.”  The regulatory agencies have issued a final rule to implement this requirement.  The final rule provides that the definition of “qualified residential mortgage” includes loans that meet the definition of qualified mortgage issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for purposes of its regulations.

 

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These rules could have a significant effect on the secondary market for loans and the types of loans we originate, and restrict our ability or desire to make certain types of loans or loans to certain borrowers, which could limit our growth or profitability.

 

Our funding sources may prove insufficient to replace deposits at maturity and support our future growth.

 

We must maintain sufficient funds to respond to the needs of depositors and borrowers.  As a part of our liquidity management, we use a number of funding sources in addition to core deposit growth and repayments and maturities of loans and investments.  As we continue to grow, we are likely to become more dependent on these sources, which may include Federal Home Loan Bank advances, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, proceeds from the sale of loans, federal funds purchased and brokered certificates of deposit.  Adverse operating results or changes in industry conditions could lead to difficulty or an inability to access these additional funding sources.  Our financial flexibility will be severely constrained if we are unable to maintain our access to funding or if adequate financing is not available to accommodate future growth at acceptable interest rates.  If we are required to rely more heavily on more expensive funding sources to support future growth, our revenues may not increase proportionately to cover our costs.  In this case, our operating margins and profitability would be adversely affected.

 

We are subject to environmental liability risk associated with lending activities.

 

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real estate, and we could become subject to environmental liabilities with respect to one or more of these properties. During the ordinary course of business, we may foreclose on and take title to properties securing defaulted loans. In doing so, there is a risk that hazardous or toxic substances could be found on these properties. If hazardous conditions or toxic substances are found on these properties, we may be liable for remediation costs, as well as for personal injury and property damage, civil fines and criminal penalties regardless of when the hazardous conditions or toxic substances first affected any particular property. Environmental laws may require us to incur substantial expenses to address unknown liabilities and may materially reduce the affected property’s value or limit our ability to use or sell the affected property. In addition, future laws or more stringent interpretations or enforcement policies with respect to existing laws may increase our exposure to environmental liability. Although we have policies and procedures to perform an environmental review before initiating any foreclosure action on nonresidential real property, these reviews may not be sufficient to detect all potential environmental hazards. The remediation costs and any other financial liabilities associated with an environmental hazard could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Changes in management’s estimates and assumptions may have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and our financial condition or operating results.

 

In preparing this annual report as well as other periodic reports we are required to file under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including our consolidated financial statements, our management is and will be required under applicable rules and regulations to make estimates and assumptions as of a specified date. These estimates and assumptions are based on management’s best estimates and experience as of that date and are subject to substantial risk and uncertainty.  Materially different results may occur as circumstances change and additional information becomes known. Areas requiring significant estimates and assumptions by management include our valuation of investment securities, our determination of our income tax provision, and our evaluation of the adequacy of our allowance for loan losses.

 

ITEM 1B.   Unresolved Staff Comments

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 2.                           Properties

 

We operate from our corporate office in Honolulu, Hawaii, and from our 28 full-service branches located in the State of Hawaii.  The net book value of our premises, land and equipment was $4.9 million at December 31, 2015.  The following table sets forth information with respect to our full-service banking offices, including the expiration date of leases with respect to leased facilities.

 

AINA HAINA
Aina Haina Shopping Center
820 West Hind Drive
Honolulu, Oahu 96821
4/30/2021

 

KAILUA
19 Oneawa Street
Kailua, Oahu 96734

 

KAUAI
Kukui Grove Shopping Center
4393 Kukui Grove Street
Lihue, Kauai 96766
2/28/2018

 

NUUANU
Nuuanu Shopping Center
1613 Nuuanu Avenue
Honolulu, Oahu 96817
7/22/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALA MOANA CENTER
1450 Ala Moana Boulevard
Honolulu, Oahu 96814
12/31/2017

 

KAIMUKI
1108 12th Avenue
Honolulu, Oahu 96816
12/31/2018

 

KIHEI
Azeka Shopping Center
1279 South Kihei Road
Kihei, Maui 96753
1/31/2019

 

PEARL CITY
Pearl City Shopping Center
850 Kamehameha Highway
Pearl City, Oahu 96782
9/22/2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DOWNTOWN
1000 Bishop Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96813
12/31/2020

 

KALIHI-KAPALAMA
1199 Dillingham Boulevard
Honolulu, Oahu 96817 8/31/2017

 

KONA
Crossroads Shopping Center
75-1027 Henry Street
Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 96740
8/31/2020

 

PEARLRIDGE
98-084 Kamehameha Highway
Aiea, Oahu 96701
6/30/2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HAWAII KAI
Hawaii Kai Shopping Center
377 Keahole Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96825
9/30/2018

 

KAMEHAMEHA SHOPPING CENTER
1620 North School Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96817
6/30/2025

 

LAHAINA
Old Lahaina Center
170 Papalaua Street
Lahaina, Maui 96761
3/31/2023

 

PIIKOI
1159 South Beretania Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96814
12/31/2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HILO
Waiakea Center
315 Makaala Street
Hilo, Hawaii 96720
12/31/2018

 

KANEOHE
46-005 Kawa Street
Kaneohe, Oahu 96744
12/31/2019

 

MANOA
Manoa Marketplace
2752 Woodlawn Drive
Honolulu, Oahu 96822
7/10/2023

 

SALT LAKE
Salt Lake Shopping Center
848 Ala Lilikoi Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96818
1/31/2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAHALA
4819 Kilauea Avenue
Honolulu, Oahu 96816
3/31/2020

 

KAPAHULU
Kilohana Square
1016 Kapahulu Avenue
Honolulu, Oahu 96816
11/14/2018

 

McCULLY
1111 McCully Street
Honolulu, Oahu 96826
5/31/2018

 

WAIPAHU
Waipahu Town Center
94-050 Farrington Highway
Waipahu, Oahu 96797
12/31/2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KAHULUI
Queen Kaahumanu Center
275 W. Kaahumanu Avenue
Kahului, Maui 96732
12/31/2019

 

KAPOLEI
Ace Center at Kapolei
480 Kamokila Boulevard
Kapolei, Oahu 96709
7/31/2019

 

MILILANI
Town Center of Mililani
95-1249 Meheula Parkway
Mililani, Oahu 96789
10/11/2019

 

WAIPIO
Laniakea Plaza
94-1221 Ka Uka Boulevard
Waipahu, Oahu 96797
9/30/2016

 

ITEM 3.                           Legal Proceedings

 

From time to time, we are involved as plaintiff or defendant in various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business.  Except as previously disclosed, at December 31, 2015, we were not involved in any legal proceedings, the outcome of which we believe would be material to our financial condition or results of operations.

 

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ITEM 4.                           Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.                           Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

(a)  Market, Holder and Dividend Information.  Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “TBNK.”  The approximate number of holders of record of Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s common stock as of February 29, 2016 was 1,177.  Certain shares of Territorial Bancorp Inc. are held in “nominee” or “street” name and, accordingly, the number of beneficial owners of such shares is not known or included in the foregoing number.  The following table presents quarterly market and dividend information for Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s common stock for the two years ended December 31, 2015.  The following information with respect to high and low closing prices was provided by the NASDAQ Global Select Market.

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Dividends
Declared Per
Share

 

Year Ended December 31, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter ended December 31, 2015

 

$

29.13

 

$

26.06

 

$

0.27

 

Quarter ended September 30, 2015

 

$

26.77

 

$

24.54

 

$

0.17

 

Quarter ended June 30, 2015

 

$

24.26

 

$

22.69

 

$

0.16

 

Quarter ended March 31, 2015

 

$

23.76

 

$

21.20

 

$

0.16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quarter ended December 31, 2014

 

$

21.95

 

$

20.34

 

$

0.26

 

Quarter ended September 30, 2014

 

$

21.24

 

$

20.10

 

$

0.15

 

Quarter ended June 30, 2014

 

$

21.59

 

$

19.82

 

$

0.15

 

Quarter ended March 31, 2014

 

$

23.08

 

$

21.60

 

$

0.14

 

 

Dividend payments by Territorial Bancorp Inc. are dependent on dividends it receives from Territorial Savings Bank, because Territorial Bancorp Inc. has no source of income other than dividends from Territorial Savings Bank, earnings from the investment of proceeds from the sale of shares of common stock and interest payments with respect to Territorial Bancorp Inc.’s loan to the Employee Stock Ownership Plan.  See “Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation—Federal Banking Regulation—Capital Distributions” and “—Holding Company Regulation—Dividends and Stock Repurchases.”

 

(b)  Sales of Unregistered Securities.  Not applicable.

 

(c)   Use of Proceeds.  Not applicable.

 

(d)  Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans.  See “Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.”

 

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(e)   Stock Repurchases.  The following table sets forth information in connection with repurchases of our shares of common stock during the fourth quarter of 2015:

 

Period

 

Total Number of
Shares Purchased

 

Average Price
Paid per
Share

 

Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or
Programs

 

Maximum Number of
Shares That May Yet
be Purchased Under
the Plans or
Programs (1)

 

October 1, 2015 through October 31, 2015

 

18,098

 

$

26.04

 

18,098

 

20,637

 

November 1, 2015 through November 30, 2015

 

 

 

 

20,637

 

December 1, 2015 through December 31, 2015

 

20,637

 

28.89

 

20,637

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

38,735

 

$

27.56

 

38,735

 

 

 


(1)         On December 4, 2014, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 400,000 shares of our common stock.  The Company initially repurchased a total of 250,000 shares.  Further repurchases were subject to the receipt of regulatory approvals or non-objections for the employee stock ownership plan to own 10% or more of the Company’s outstanding shares of common stock.  On July 1, 2015, the Company received the final regulatory approval needed for the ESOP to own more than 10% of the Company’s common stock.  In accordance with this authorization, we completed the repurchase of 400,000 shares of our common stock as of December 31, 2015. We have entered into a Rule 10b5-1 plan with respect to our stock repurchase plan.

 

(f)   Stock Performance Graph.  Set forth below is a stock performance graph comparing (a) the cumulative total return on our shares of common stock between December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2015, (b) the cumulative total return on stocks included in the Total Return Index for the NASDAQ Stock Market (US) over such period, and (c) the cumulative total return on stocks included in the SNL Bank and Thrift Index over such period.  Cumulative return assumes the reinvestment of dividends, and is expressed in dollars based on an assumed investment of $100.

 

There can be no assurance that the Company’s stock performance will continue in the future with the same or similar trend depicted in the graph.  The Company will not make or endorse any predictions as to future stock performance.

 

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ITEM 6.           Selected Financial Data

 

The following selected financial data and ratios have been derived, in part, from the consolidated financial statements and notes appearing elsewhere in this annual report.

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Selected Financial Condition Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

1,821,141

 

$

1,691,897

 

$

1,616,904

 

$

1,574,627

 

$

1,537,571

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

65,919

 

75,060

 

75,365

 

182,818

 

131,937

 

Investment securities held to maturity

 

493,059

 

572,922

 

613,436

 

554,673

 

653,871

 

Loans receivable, net

 

1,188,649

 

968,212

 

856,542

 

774,876

 

688,095

 

Bank-owned life insurance

 

42,328

 

41,303

 

40,243

 

31,177

 

30,234

 

Federal Home Loan Bank stock, at cost

 

4,790

 

11,234

 

11,689

 

12,128

 

12,348

 

Deposits

 

1,445,103

 

1,359,679

 

1,288,709

 

1,237,847

 

1,166,116

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

69,000

 

15,000

 

15,000

 

20,000

 

20,000

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

55,000

 

72,000

 

72,000

 

70,000

 

108,300

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

219,641

 

216,378

 

212,140

 

218,972

 

213,961

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Selected Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest and dividend income

 

$

63,092

 

$

59,615

 

$

56,175

 

$

60,149

 

$

62,733

 

Interest expense

 

6,515

 

6,118

 

6,282

 

9,229

 

11,285

 

Net interest income

 

56,577

 

53,497

 

49,893

 

50,920

 

51,448

 

Provision for loan losses

 

455

 

360

 

39

 

415

 

418

 

Net interest and dividend income after provision for loan losses

 

56,122

 

53,137

 

49,854

 

50,505

 

51,030

 

Noninterest income

 

4,911

 

5,177

 

8,716

 

7,068

 

5,111

 

Noninterest expense

 

36,499

 

35,308

 

35,077

 

34,438

 

34,654

 

Income before income taxes

 

24,534

 

23,006

 

23,493

 

23,135

 

21,487

 

Income taxes

 

9,786

 

8,909

 

8,846

 

8,297

 

8,698

 

Net income

 

$

14,748

 

$

14,097

 

$

14,647

 

$

14,838

 

$

12,789

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

 

 

At or For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selected Financial Ratios and Other Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Performance Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return on average assets (ratio of net income to average total assets)

 

0.84

%

0.85

%

0.93

%

0.95

%

0.85

%

Return on average equity (ratio of net income to average equity)

 

6.75

%

6.54

%

6.71

%

6.78

%

5.72

%

Interest rate spread (1)

 

3.29

%

3.30

%

3.22

%

3.25

%

3.41

%

Net interest margin (2)

 

3.36

%

3.37

%

3.28

%

3.36

%

3.55

%

Efficiency ratio (3)

 

59.36

%

60.18

%

59.85

%

59.39

%

61.27

%

Noninterest expense to average total assets

 

2.08

%

2.13

%

2.22

%

2.20

%

2.31

%

Average interest-earning assets to average interest-bearing liabilities

 

115.86

%

115.83

%

117.07

%

117.38

%

118.21

%

Average equity to average total assets

 

12.46

%

13.02

%

13.82

%

13.97

%

14.91

%

Basic earnings per share

 

$

1.63

 

$

1.53

 

$

1.51

 

$

1.47

 

$

1.19

 

Diluted earnings per share

 

$

1.59

 

$

1.51

 

$

1.49

 

$

1.45

 

$

1.17

 

Dividend payout ratio

 

47.80

%

46.36

%

41.61

%

37.24

%

29.06

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset Quality Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonperforming assets to total assets

 

0.30

%

0.26

%

0.37

%

0.28

%

0.22

%

Nonperforming loans to total loans

 

0.45

%

0.46

%

0.69

%

0.56

%

0.42

%

Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans

 

40.00

%

37.97

%

24.77

%

37.95

%

52.65

%

Allowance for loan losses to total loans

 

0.18

%

0.17

%

0.17

%

0.22

%

0.22

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capital Ratios (bank-level only):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total capital (to risk-weighted assets)

 

26.07

%

29.93

%

31.99

%

36.87

%

38.76

%

Common equity Tier 1 capital (to risk-weighted assets) (4)

 

25.79

%

n/a

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

n/a

 

Tier I capital (to risk-weighted assets)

 

25.79

%

29.68

%

31.75

%

36.57

%

38.47

%

Tier I capital (to total assets)

 

11.49

%

12.10

%

12.35

%

13.13

%

13.07

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of full-service offices

 

28

 

28

 

28

 

27

 

27

 

Full-time equivalent employees

 

275

 

268

 

274

 

271

 

258

 

 


(1)         The average interest rate spread represents the difference between the weighted-average yield on interest-earning assets and the weighted-average cost of interest-bearing liabilities for the year.

(2)         The net interest margin represents net interest income as a percent of average interest-earning assets for the year.

(3)         The efficiency ratio represents noninterest expense divided by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income.

(4)         Effective January 1, 2015, a new common equity Tier 1 capital standard was implemented.

 

ITEM 7.                           Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The objective of this section is to help readers understand our views on our results of operations and financial condition.  You should read this discussion in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements that appear elsewhere in this annual report.

 

Overview

 

We have historically operated as a traditional thrift institution.  The significant majority of our assets consist of long-term, fixed-rate residential mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities, which we have funded primarily with deposit accounts, securities sold under agreements to repurchase and Federal Home Loan Bank advances.  This has resulted in our being particularly vulnerable to increases in interest rates, as our interest-bearing liabilities mature or reprice more quickly than our interest-earning assets.

 

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We have continued our focus on originating one- to four-family residential real estate loans.  Our emphasis on conservative loan underwriting has resulted in low levels of nonperforming assets at a time when many financial institutions are experiencing significant asset quality issues.  Our nonperforming assets totaled $5.4 million, or 0.30% of total assets at December 31, 2015, compared to $4.5 million, or 0.26% of total assets at December 31, 2014, and $6.0 million, or 0.37% of total assets at December 31, 2013.  As of December 31, 2015, nonperforming assets consisted primarily of 22 mortgage loans for $5.4 million.  Our nonperforming loans and loss experience has enabled us to maintain a relatively low allowance for loan losses in relation to other peer institutions and correspondingly resulted in low levels of provisions for loan losses.  Our provisions for loan losses were $455,000, $360,000 and $39,000 for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

Other than our loans for the construction of one- to four-family residential homes, we do not offer “interest only” mortgage loans on one- to four-family residential properties (where the borrower pays interest for an initial period, after which the loan converts to a fully amortizing loan).  We also do not offer loans that provide for negative amortization of principal, such as “Option ARM” loans, where the borrower can pay less than the interest owed on their loan, resulting in an increased principal balance during the life of the loan.  We do not offer “subprime loans” (loans that generally target borrowers with weakened credit histories typically characterized by payment delinquencies, previous charge-offs, judgments, bankruptcies, or borrowers with questionable repayment capacity as evidenced by low credit scores or high debt-burden ratios) or Alt-A loans (traditionally defined as nonconforming loans having less than full documentation).  We also do not own any private label mortgage-backed securities that are collateralized by Alt-A, low or no documentation or subprime mortgage loans.

 

Our operations in recent years have been affected by our efforts to manage our interest rate risk position.  In 2015, we sold $56.2 million of fixed-rate mortgage loans and obtained $37.0 million of additional long-term, fixed-rate borrowings.  In 2014, we sold $37.5 million of fixed-rate mortgage loans.  In 2013, we sold $82.2 million of fixed-rate mortgage loans, obtained $30.0 million of long-term, fixed-rate borrowings and purchased $5.1 million of shorter-duration mortgage-backed securities.  See “—Management of Market Risk” for a discussion of the actions we took in 2015, 2014 and 2013 in managing interest rate risk.

 

Territorial Savings Bank’s investments in mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations have been issued by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae, which are U.S. government-sponsored enterprises, or Ginnie Mae, which is a U.S. government agency.  These agencies guarantee the payment of principal and interest on the Bank’s mortgage-backed securities.  We do not own any preferred stock issued by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.  As of December 31, 2015, our additional borrowing capacity at the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines was $555.1 million.  As of December 31, 2014, our additional borrowing capacity at the Federal Home Loan Bank of Seattle was $399.0 million.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

We consider accounting policies that require management to exercise significant judgment or discretion or make significant assumptions that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income, to be critical accounting policies.  We consider the following to be our critical accounting policies:

 

Allowance for Loan Losses.  We maintain an allowance for loan losses at an amount estimated to equal all credit losses incurred in our loan portfolio that are both probable and reasonable to estimate at a balance sheet date.  To estimate credit losses on impaired loans (in accordance with the Receivables topic of the FASB ASC), we evaluate numerous factors, as described below in “—Allowance for Loan Losses.”  Based on our estimate of the level of allowance for loan losses required, we record a provision for loan losses to maintain the allowance for loan losses at an amount that provides for all losses that are both probable and reasonable to estimate.

 

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Since we cannot predict with certainty the amount of loan charge-offs that will be incurred and because the eventual level of loan charge-offs is affected by numerous conditions beyond our control, a range of loss estimates can reasonably be used to determine the allowance for loan losses and the related provisions for loan losses.  In addition, various regulatory agencies, as an integral part of their examination processes, periodically review our allowance for loan losses.  Such agencies may require that we recognize additions to the allowance for loan losses based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination.  Accordingly, actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

 

Deterioration in the Hawaii real estate market could result in an increase in loan delinquencies, additional increases in our allowance for loan losses and provision for loan losses, as well as an increase in loan charge-offs.

 

Securities Impairment.  We periodically perform analyses to determine whether there has been an other-than-temporary decline in the value of our securities.  Our held-to-maturity securities consist primarily of debt securities for which we have a positive intent and ability to hold to maturity, and are carried at amortized cost.  Our available-for-sale securities are carried at fair value.  We conduct a quarterly review and evaluation of the securities portfolio to determine if the value of any security has declined below its cost or amortized cost, and whether such decline is other-than-temporary.  If such decline is deemed other-than-temporary, we would adjust the cost basis of the security by writing down the security for any credit losses through a charge on the income statement.  The market values of our securities are affected by changes in interest rates as well as shifts in the market’s perception of the issuers.  The fair value of investment securities is usually based on quoted market prices or dealer quotes.  However, if there are no observable market inputs (for securities such as trust preferred securities), we estimate the fair value using unobservable inputs.  We discount projected cash flows using a risk-adjusted discount rate in accordance with the Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures topic of the FASB ASC.

 

Our investment in PreTSL XXIII was determined to be other-than-temporarily impaired and we recorded an impairment charge of $2.4 million in the year ended December 31, 2010.   PreTSL XXIII has a book value of $916,000 at December 31, 2015.  The difference between the book value of $916,000 and the remaining unamortized cost basis of $1.1 million is reported as other comprehensive loss and is related to noncredit factors such as an inactive trust preferred securities market.

 

See also “Item 1A. Risk Factors” for a discussion on our investment in trust preferred securities.

 

We evaluated our $4.8 million investment in FHLB stock for other-than-temporary impairment as of December 31, 2015.  Considering the long-term nature of this investment and the liquidity position of the FHLB of Des Moines, our FHLB stock was not considered other-than-temporarily impaired.  As of December 31, 2015, the FHLB of Des Moines has met all of its regulatory capital requirements.  Moody’s Investor Services and Standard and Poor’s have given the FHLB of Des Moines long-term credit ratings of Aaa and AA+, respectively.

 

We evaluated our $3.0 million investment in FRB stock for other-than-temporary impairment as of December 31, 2015.  Based on the long-term nature of this investment and the liquidity position of the FRB of San Francisco, our FRB stock was not considered to be other-than-temporarily impaired.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Deferred Tax Assets.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated future tax effects attributable to temporary differences and carryforwards.  A valuation allowance may be required if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.  In determining whether a valuation allowance is necessary, we consider the level of taxable income in prior years, to the extent that carrybacks are permitted under current tax laws, as well as estimates of future taxable income and tax planning strategies that could be implemented to accelerate taxable income if necessary.  If our estimates of future taxable income were materially overstated or if our assumptions regarding the tax consequences of tax planning strategies were inaccurate, some or all of our deferred tax assets may not be realized, which would result in a charge to earnings.

 

Defined Benefit Retirement Plan.  Defined benefit plan obligations and related assets of our defined benefit retirement plan are presented in Note 17 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.  Effective December 31, 2008, the defined benefit retirement plan was frozen and all plan benefits were fixed as of that date.  Plan assets, which consist primarily of marketable equity securities and mutual funds, are typically valued using market quotations.  Plan obligations and the annual pension expense are determined by independent actuaries through the use of a number of assumptions.  Key assumptions in measuring the plan obligations include the discount rate and the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets.  In determining the discount rate, we utilize a yield that reflects the top 50% of the universe of bonds, ranked in the order of the highest yield.  These bonds provide cash flows that match the timing of expected benefit payments.  Asset returns are based upon the anticipated average rate of earnings expected on the invested funds of the plans.

 

At December 31, 2015, we used weighted-average discount rates of 4.10% and 4.40% for calculating annual pension expense and projected plan liabilities, respectively, and an expected long-term rate of return on plan assets of 7.50% for calculating annual pension expense.  At December 31, 2014, we used a weighted-average discount rate of 4.90% and 4.10% for calculating annual pension expense and projected plan liabilities, respectively, and an expected long-term rate of return on plan assets of 7.50% for calculating annual pension expense.  For both the discount rate and the asset return rate, a range of estimates could reasonably have been used, which would affect the amount of pension expense and pension liability recorded.

 

A decrease in the discount rate or an increase in the asset return rate would reduce pension expense in 2015, while an increase in the discount rate or a decrease in the asset return rate would have the opposite effect.  A 25 basis point decrease in the discount rate assumptions would decrease 2015 pension expense by $3,000 and increase year-end 2015 pension liability by $554,000, while a 25 basis point decrease in the asset return rate would increase 2015 pension expense by $33,000.

 

Balance Sheet Analysis

 

Assets.  At December 31, 2015, our assets were $1.821 billion, an increase of $129.2 million, or 7.6%, from $1.692 billion at December 31, 2014.  The increase was primarily caused by a $220.4 million increase in loans receivable that occurred as loan production exceeded loan sales and repayments.  This was partially offset by a $79.9 million decrease in investment securities that occurred as repayments and sales exceeded purchases.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents.   At December 31, 2015, we had $65.9 million of cash and cash equivalents compared to $75.1 million at December 31, 2014.   During 2015, cash and cash equivalents decreased by $9.1 million primarily due to a $220.4 million increase in loans receivable, $8.9 million of common stock repurchases, a $17.0 million decrease in securities sold under agreements to repurchase and the $7.0 million payment of common stock dividends.  These uses of cash were partially offset by an $85.4 million increase in deposits, a $79.9 million decrease in investment securities, a $54.0 million increase in FHLB advances, net income of $14.7 million, and a $6.4 million decrease in FHLB stock.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Loan Portfolio Composition.  The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio at the dates indicated.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

 

 

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

Amount

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First mortgage:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

1,145,904

 

95.90

%

$

926,074

 

95.08

%

$

823,273

 

95.41

%

$

741,334

 

94.84

%

$

654,412

 

94.13

%

Multi-family residential

 

9,834

 

0.82

 

8,920

 

0.92

 

4,877

 

0.57

 

6,888

 

0.88

 

6,956

 

1.00

 

Construction, commercial and other

 

19,288

 

1.62

 

18,415

 

1.89

 

13,554

 

1.57

 

13,819

 

1.77

 

11,140

 

1.60

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit

 

15,333

 

1.28

 

15,992

 

1.64

 

16,524

 

1.91

 

15,202

 

1.94

 

17,253

 

2.48

 

Other loans

 

4,543

 

0.38

 

4,614

 

0.47

 

4,649

 

0.54

 

4,481

 

0.57

 

5,488

 

0.79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans

 

1,194,902

 

100.00

%

974,015

 

100.00

%

862,877

 

100.00

%

781,724

 

100.00

%

695,249

 

100.00

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other items:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unearned fees and discounts, net

 

(4,087

)

 

 

(4,112

)

 

 

(4,849

)

 

 

(5,176

)

 

 

(5,613

)

 

 

Allowance for loan losses

 

(2,166

)

 

 

(1,691

)

 

 

(1,486

)

 

 

(1,672

)

 

 

(1,541

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans receivable, net

 

$

1,188,649

 

 

 

$

968,212

 

 

 

$

856,542

 

 

 

$

774,876

 

 

 

$

688,095

 

 

 

 

Loan Portfolio Maturities and Yields.  The following table summarizes the scheduled maturities of our loan portfolio at December 31, 2015.  Demand loans, loans having no stated repayment schedule or maturity, and overdraft loans are reported as being due in one year or less.

 

 

 

One- to four-family
residential real estate

 

Multi-family residential
real estate

 

Construction, commercial
and other real estate

 

Home equity loans and
lines of credit

 

Other loans

 

Total

 

Due During the Years
Ending December 31,

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Amount

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

$

 

%

$

 

%

$

209

 

7.00

%

$

4

 

0.95

%

$

744

 

6.81

%

$

957

 

6.83

%

2017 to 2020

 

2,845

 

5.23

 

639

 

5.28

 

2,132

 

5.39

 

3,093

 

5.35

 

726

 

5.65

 

9,435

 

5.34

 

2021 and beyond

 

1,143,059

 

4.05

 

9,195

 

4.65

 

16,947

 

4.58

 

12,236

 

4.07

 

3,073

 

4.99

 

1,184,510

 

4.06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

1,145,904

 

4.05

%

$

9,834

 

4.69

%

$

19,288

 

4.70

%

$

15,333

 

4.33

%

$

4,543

 

5.39

%

$

1,194,902

 

4.07

%

 

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Table of Contents

 

The following table sets forth the scheduled repayments of fixed- and adjustable-rate loans at December 31, 2015 that are contractually due after December 31, 2016.

 

 

 

Due After December 31, 2016

 

 

 

Fixed

 

Adjustable

 

Total

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First mortgage:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

1,142,591

 

$

3,313

 

$

1,145,904

 

Multi-family residential

 

9,195

 

639

 

9,834

 

Construction, commercial and other

 

15,501

 

3,578

 

19,079

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit

 

2,987

 

12,342

 

15,329

 

Other loans

 

3,416

 

383

 

3,799

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans

 

$

1,173,690

 

$

20,255

 

$

1,193,945

 

 

Securities.  At December 31, 2015, our securities portfolio totaled $493.1 million, or 27.1% of assets.  At that date, our securities held to maturity consisted of securities with the following amortized costs: $481.5 million of mortgage-backed securities, $10.7 million of collateralized mortgage obligations and $916,000 of trust preferred securities.  All of the mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations were issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae.  At December 31, 2015, none of the underlying collateral consisted of subprime or Alt-A loans (traditionally defined as nonconforming loans having less than full documentation).  At December 31, 2015, we held no common or preferred stock of Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2015 our securities portfolio decreased by $79.9 million, or 13.9%, primarily due to repayments and sales exceeding purchases.

 

The following table sets forth the amortized cost and estimated fair value of our securities portfolio at the dates indicated.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair Value

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair Value

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair Value

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Held to Maturity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government sponsored mortgage-backed securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fannie Mae

 

$

174,947

 

$

175,432

 

$

204,184

 

$

207,000

 

$

200,058

 

$

191,717

 

Freddie Mac

 

249,473

 

254,515

 

292,890

 

302,943

 

331,753

 

326,707

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations (1)

 

10,668

 

10,349

 

17,315

 

17,178

 

26,238

 

25,853

 

Ginnie Mae

 

57,055

 

56,770

 

57,843

 

58,899

 

54,850

 

53,193

 

Total U.S. government sponsored mortgage-backed securities

 

492,143

 

497,066

 

572,232

 

586,020

 

612,899

 

597,470

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trust preferred securities

 

916

 

916

 

690

 

690

 

537

 

537

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

493,059

 

$

497,982

 

$

572,922

 

$

586,710

 

$

613,436

 

$

598,007

 

 


(1)         All of our collateralized mortgage obligations have been issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Any unrealized loss on individual mortgage-backed securities as of December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013 was caused by increases in market interest rates.  All of our mortgage-backed securities are guaranteed by U.S. government-sponsored enterprises or a U.S. government agency.  Since the decline in market value has been attributable to changes in interest rates and not credit quality, we continue to have the intent not to sell these investments, and it is not more likely than not that we will be required to sell such investments prior to the recovery of the amortized cost basis, we have not considered these investments to be other-than-temporarily impaired as of December 31, 2015, 2014 or 2013.

 

At December 31, 2015, we owned a trust preferred security with an amortized cost of $916,000.  This security represents an investment in a pool of debt obligations issued primarily by holding companies of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-insured financial institutions.

 

The trust preferred securities market is considered to be inactive as only six transactions have occurred over the past 48 months in the same tranche of securities that we own and no new issues of pooled trust preferred securities have occurred since 2007.  We used a discounted cash flow model to determine whether these securities are other-than-temporarily impaired.  The assumptions used in preparing the discounted cash flow model include the following: estimated discount rates, estimated deferral and default rates on collateral, and estimated cash flows.  We used a discount rate equal to three-month LIBOR plus 20.00%.

 

See also “Item 1A. Risk Factors” for a discussion on our investment in trust preferred securities.

 

At December 31, 2015, we had no investments in a single company (other than U.S. government sponsored enterprises) or entity that had an aggregate book value in excess of 10% of our consolidated stockholders’ equity.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Portfolio Maturities and Coupons.  The composition and maturities of the investment securities portfolio at December 31, 2015 are summarized in the following table.  Maturities are based on the final contractual payment dates, and do not reflect the impact of prepayments or early redemptions that may occur.  No tax-equivalent adjustments have been made, as we did not hold any tax-free investment securities at December 31, 2015.

 

 

 

One Year or Less

 

More than One Year
through Five Years

 

More than Five Years
through Ten Years

 

More than Ten Years

 

Total Securities

 

 

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Weighted
Average
Coupon

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Weighted
Average
Coupon

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Weighted
Average
Coupon

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Weighted
Average
Coupon

 

Amortized
Cost

 

Fair Value

 

Weighted
Average
Coupon

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Held to Maturity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government sponsored mortgage-backed securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fannie Mae

 

$

 

%

$

28

 

4.54

%

$

 

%

$

174,919

 

3.13

%

$

174,947

 

$

175,432

 

3.13

%

Freddie Mac

 

 

 

4

 

4.50

 

7

 

5.00

 

249,462

 

3.32

 

249,473

 

254,515

 

3.32

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,668

 

2.12

 

10,668

 

10,349

 

2.12

 

Ginnie Mae

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57,055

 

3.04

 

57,055

 

56,770

 

3.04

 

Total U.S. government sponsored mortgage-backed securities

 

 

 

32

 

4.54

 

7

 

5.00

 

492,104

 

3.19

 

492,143

 

497,066

 

3.19

 

Trust preferred securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

916

 

2.61

 

916

 

916

 

2.61

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

 

%

$

32

 

4.54

%

$

7

 

5.00

%

$

493,020

 

3.19

%

$

493,059

 

$

497,982

 

3.19

%

 


(1)          All of our collateralized mortgage obligations have been issued by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac or Ginnie Mae.

 

Bank-Owned Life Insurance.  We invest in bank-owned life insurance to provide us with a funding source for our benefit plan obligations.  Bank-owned life insurance also generally provides us noninterest income that is nontaxable.  Interagency federal guidance generally limits our investment in bank-owned life insurance to 25% of the Bank’s Tier 1 capital plus our allowance for loan losses.  At December 31, 2015, this limit was $52.6 million, and we had invested $42.3 million in bank-owned life insurance at that date.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Deposits.  We accept deposits primarily from the areas in which our offices are located.  We rely on our competitive pricing, convenient locations and customer service to attract and retain deposits.  We offer a variety of deposit accounts with a range of interest rates and terms.  Our deposit accounts consist of passbook and statement savings accounts, certificates of deposit, money market accounts, commercial and regular checking accounts and Super NOW accounts.  Historically, we have not accepted brokered deposits.

 

Interest rates paid, maturity terms, service fees and withdrawal penalties are established on a periodic basis.  Deposit rates and terms are based primarily on current operating strategies, market interest rates, liquidity requirements and our deposit growth goals.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2015, our deposits grew by $85.4 million, or 6.3%.  The increase was caused primarily by our strategy of promoting higher-than-market rates for our passbook and statement savings accounts.  Savings accounts grew by $56.8 million, or 6.0%, because of the higher interest rates offered.  We also believe that the ability to get immediate access to their funds without incurring an early withdrawal penalty appeals to customers.

 

At December 31, 2015, we had a total of $224.0 million in certificates of deposit, of which $165.0 million had remaining maturities of one year or less.  Based on historical experience and our current pricing strategy, we believe we will retain a significant portion of these accounts upon maturity.

 

The following tables set forth the distribution of our average total deposit accounts (including interest-bearing and non-interest-bearing deposits), by account type, for the periods indicated.

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

 

 

Average
Balance

 

Percent

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

Average
Balance

 

Percent

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposit type:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-interest-bearing

 

$

43,591

 

3.1

%

%

$

36,812

 

2.8

%

%

Savings accounts

 

965,754

 

69.3

 

0.38

%

926,080

 

70.0

 

0.36

%

Certificates of deposit

 

225,048

 

16.2

 

0.50

%

215,127

 

16.3

 

0.50

%

Money market

 

1,117

 

0.1

 

0.27

%

801

 

0.1

 

0.25

%

Checking and Super NOW

 

156,776

 

11.3

 

0.02

%

142,726

 

10.8

 

0.02

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total deposits

 

$

1,392,286

 

100.0

%

0.35

%

$

1,321,546

 

100.0

%

0.34

%

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31, 2013

 

 

 

Average
Balance

 

Percent

 

Weighted
Average
Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposit type:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-interest-bearing

 

$

31,863

 

2.6

%

%

Savings accounts

 

889,986

 

71.2

 

0.34

%

Certificates of deposit

 

197,604

 

15.8

 

0.62

%

Money market

 

761

 

0.1

 

0.26

%

Checking and Super NOW

 

129,160

 

10.3

 

0.02

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total deposits

 

$

1,249,374

 

100.0

%

0.34

%

 

44



Table of Contents

 

As of December 31, 2015, the aggregate amount of outstanding certificates of deposit in amounts greater than or equal to $100,000 was $172.2 million.  The following table sets forth the maturity of those certificates as of December 31, 2015.

 

 

 

At
December 31, 2015

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

Three months or less

 

$

97,017

 

Over three months through six months

 

41,296

 

Over six months through one year

 

5,581

 

Over one year to three years

 

8,911

 

Over three years

 

19,423

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

172,228

 

 

Borrowings.  Our borrowings consist of advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank and funds borrowed under securities sold under agreements to repurchase.  At December 31, 2015, our Federal Home Loan Bank advances totaled $69.0 million, or 4.3% of total liabilities and our securities sold under agreements to repurchase totaled $55.0 million, or 3.4% of total liabilities.  At December 31, 2015, we had the capability to borrow up to $555.1 million in the form of additional advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2015, our borrowings increased by $37.0 million, or 42.5%.  The increase occurred when we had a $54.0 million net increase in Federal Home Loan Bank advances that was partially offset by a $17.0 million net pay off of securities sold under agreements to repurchase.  We have not required any other borrowings to fund our operations.  Instead, we have primarily funded our operations with the net proceeds from our stock offering, additional deposits, proceeds from loan and security sales and principal repayments on loans and mortgage-backed securities.

 

The following table sets forth information concerning balances and interest rates on our Federal Home Loan Bank advances at the dates and for the years indicated.

 

 

 

At or For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at end of year

 

$

69,000

 

$

15,000

 

$

15,000

 

Average balance during year

 

$

46,186

 

$

15,000

 

$

15,836

 

Maximum outstanding at any month end

 

$

69,000

 

$

15,000

 

$

20,000

 

Weighted average interest rate at end of year

 

1.49

%

1.77

%

1.77

%

Average interest rate during year

 

1.51

%

1.77

%

1.91

%

 

The following table sets forth information concerning balances and interest rates on our securities sold under agreements to repurchase at the dates and for the years indicated.

 

 

 

At or For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance at end of year

 

$

55,000

 

$

72,000

 

$

72,000

 

Average balance during year

 

$

60,014

 

$

72,000

 

$

64,111

 

Maximum outstanding at any month end

 

$

72,000

 

$

72,000

 

$

72,000

 

Weighted average interest rate at end of year

 

1.57

%

1.88

%

1.88

%

Average interest rate during year

 

1.66

%

1.88

%

2.63

%

 

Stockholders’ Equity.  At December 31, 2015, our stockholders’ equity was $219.6 million, an increase of $3.3 million, or 1.5%, from $216.4 million at December 31, 2014.  The increase in stockholders’ equity primarily resulted from net income of $14.7 million, a $3.1 million increase in paid-in-capital related to share-based compensation awards and a $1.2 million increase due to the allocation of ESOP shares. This was partially offset by the declaration of $7.0 million of dividends during the year ended December 31, 2015 and $8.9 million spent to repurchase 373,711 shares of our common stock.

 

45



Table of Contents

 

Average Balances and Yields

 

The following tables set forth average balance sheets, average yields and rates, and certain other information for the years indicated.  No tax-equivalent yield adjustments were made, as we did not hold any tax-free investments.  All average balances are daily average balances.  Nonaccrual loans were included in the computation of average balances, but have been reflected in the table as loans carrying a zero yield.  The yields set forth below include the effect of net deferred costs, discounts and premiums that are amortized or accreted to interest income.

 

 

 

For the Year Ended
December 31, 2015

 

 

 

Average
Outstanding
Balance

 

Interest

 

Yield/ Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First mortgage:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential (1)

 

$

1,050,352

 

$

43,654

 

4.16

%

Multi-family residential

 

9,692

 

459

 

4.74

 

Construction, commercial and other

 

18,110

 

837

 

4.62

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit

 

15,560

 

709

 

4.56

 

Other loans

 

4,502

 

244

 

5.42

 

Total loans

 

1,098,216

 

45,903

 

4.18

 

Investment securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government sponsored mortgage-backed securities (1)

 

529,535

 

16,873

 

3.19

 

Trust preferred securities

 

790

 

 

 

Total securities

 

530,325

 

16,873

 

3.18

 

Other

 

57,147

 

316

 

0.55

 

Total interest-earning assets

 

1,685,688

 

63,092

 

3.74

 

Non-interest-earning assets

 

67,486

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

1,753,174